Tuesday, 24 May 2022, 10:42 PM
Site: Flinders Learning Online
Topic: FLO Staff Support (FLO_Staff_Support)
Glossary: How-to glossary

Tool options - quiz and survey

FLO ecosystem  |  Tool options (specific purposes)  ||  Support 

These tools are available in FLO. For external tool options, contact your local eLearning support team.

What do you want to do? Tool options

Self-assess/check knowledge/mini-test

active quiz icon Active quiz (in class)
Create a session to test students' knowledge/other purpose; view the results in class (real time) (can be anonymous or with names)

choice icon Choice (in class)
Ask a single question and offer a selection of possible responses; view in class (can be anonymous or with names). Purpose could be to quickly test understanding

quiz icon Quiz (out of class)

At the end of a week/module, at the beginning of a topic, can be non-graded

feedback iconFeedback (out of class)
One or two questions to check understanding (active teaching) – can be anonymous, non-graded

 Poll students

active quiz iconActive quiz (in class)
Create a session to test students' knowledge/other purpose; view the results in class (real time) (can be anonymous or with names)

 feedback iconFeedback (out of class)
One or two questions to check understanding (active teaching) – can be anonymous, non-graded

choice icon Choice (out of class)
Ask a single question and offer a selection of possible responses; view in class (can be anonymous or with names). Purpose could be to stimulate thinking, quickly test understanding, or facilitate decision making/voting

Get formative feedback about how students are going 

feedback icon Touchpoint survey (out of class)
Anonymous, can add more questions or change questions

Give students exam practice (using questions from past exams)

quiz icon Quiz (out of class)
At the end of a week/module, can be non-graded

Give a topic exam 

 quiz icon Use a FLO quiz as a final exam (in/out of class)
There are four suggested stages to this quiz purpose, which requires advanced planning.

Develop students' critical thinking skills  quiz icon Quiz (in/out of class)
Questions could be set up to solve a problem or choose the best outcome/s for a scenario – a range of questions can be used
Deliver immediate feedback about performance

active quiz icon  Active quiz (in class)
Run a real-time session and view results as a group (can be anonymous or with names)

Database - create a database activity (step 1)

1. Plan  |   2. Build   |  3. Test   | 4. Administer  |  5. Review   ||  Support  

database iconThis entry relates to the Database activity.

First you have to create the activity (steps below). This provides the 'shell' for the activity. Then you will need to build the database (fields and searchability) (step 2) and create templates to aid usability (step 3).

When setting up the conditions for adding entries, you can decide whether entries need to be approved, and whether/who to give ratings to entries (if ratings are used for marking). 


Steps

  1. Turn editing on using the green button – this button is available top left of screen on the topic homepage
     Turn editing on
  2. Go to the module where you would like the database to appear
  3. Click the Add an activity or resource link at the bottom of the module
    Add an activity or resource

  4. Select Database from Activities tab
    database icon
     
  5. In the General section enter a Name for the database and some text in the Description field explaining how the database will be used
    general section

  6. Under Entries, select: 
    o whether the topic coordinator/teacher's approval is required before the entry will display to other students in the database
    o whether it is allowed to edit the approved entries (this is disabled if no approval is required)
    o whether you will allow comments on entries
    o the number of entries required for completion per student for the activity to be considered complete
    o the number of entries required before viewing other students’ entries
    o the maximum number of entries any student can contribute to the database
    database entries screen

  7. If necessary, under Availability, enable the date fields and define the periods for which the database will be available for contributions, and in read-only form (Read only from) if applicable
    Timeline block: The 'Available to' date will show to students in the Timeline block.

    database availability

  8. Set up the Ratings system if you want students to rate entries. You must save the activity before the Roles with permission to rate will display – ask your eLearning support team to add students (permissions). You can:
    o tell FLO how to decide on a final rating (Aggregate type)
    o indicate whether to apply a Scale to the ratings
    o Restrict ratings to items with dates in the given date range

    database ratings

  9. You can set up activity completion for your database based on the below conditions 

     
  10. Complete the remainder of the page and click Save and display

Assignment - create a group assignment

1. Plan  |   2. Build   |  3. Test   | 4. Administer   |  5. Review  ||  Support

assignment dropbox iconThis entry relates to the Assignment activity.

Group assignments are used when students work on an assignment in teams and upload one submission per team. Note: Before creating your group assignment, you will need to organise your students into groups and add these groups to a grouping.  

Good practice guides and tip sheets

Good practice guides and tip sheets have been developed to support quality in both curriculum design and teaching practice. Good practice guides provide a pedagogical overview and tip sheets provide you with practical strategies and ideas for implementation. Links to group-related resources are provided below. 

Group work 

 


Create a group assignment

Create an assignment (for file submissions) and make the following adjustments to the settings.


Group submission settings
Setting Description
Students submit in groups

Set to Yes to create a group assignment (this will activate the next three settings)

Students submit in groups setting 
Require group to make submission

If enabled (Yes), students who are not members of a group will be unable to make submissions

Require group to make submission setting 
Require all group members submit

This setting is enabled if Require students to click the Submit button is Yes in the Submission settings.

This setting controls whether every member of the group must click the Submit button, or whether one member can 'submit' on behalf of the group: 

  • No — When one member of a group submits an assignment it will count as submitted for the whole group
  • Yes — The assignment will not be submitted until every member of the team has clicked the Submit button (students in the group will be notified about who still needs to click the Submit button)
Require all group members submit setting
As with individual assignments, if students forget to press the Submit button you will still be able to view and mark their assignment in draft mode. We recommend that you lock the submission to prevent changes while you are marking.
Grouping for student groups

Choose the grouping you wish to use for the group assignment. Select the grouping that you created when you organised your students into groups.

Grouping for student groups setting

Important: It is vital to have your students in the right group/grouping. If you do not include a grouping for this setting, FLO will take your entire topic as a group, so the first student to submit will be submitting for everyone and their assignment submission will be visible to everyone. If this isn't set up correctly it cannot be changed once someone submits – you need to recreate the entire assignment.

Assignment - create an assignment as a take-home exam

1. Plan  |   2. Build   |  3. Test   | 4. Administer   |  5. Review  ||  Support

assignment dropbox iconThis entry relates to the Assignment activity.

The assignment tool in FLO can be used to deliver take-home exams. In this format, students get access to the exam question/topic at a particular time, then need to submit (either by uploading a file or by typing text directly into FLO) by the due date.

Good practice guides and tip sheets

Good practice guides and tip sheets have been developed to support quality in both curriculum design and teaching practice. Good practice guides provide a pedagogical overview and tip sheets provide you with practical strategies and ideas for implementation. Links to resources that relate to take-home exams are provided below. 

Appropriate use of exams

 


Create an assignment as a take-home exam

Create an assignment (for file submissions) and make the following adjustments to the settings:


General settings

Enter the instructions for the exam in the Description box and include any additional files if required.

take-home exam general settings

Availability
settings

Set the Allow submissions from date/time – this is when the exam instructions will be released to students.

Note: The Always show description box should not be ticked – this will ensure that the instructions to students only display after the Allow submissions from date/time.

Remember to set the Due date and the Cut-off date as usual (see Cut-off date/time setting additional information below).

take-home exam availability settings

Timeline block:
  • The Due date will show to students in the Timeline block, marked as 'due'
  • Dates added using completion tracking show to students in the Timeline block, marked as 'should be completed'
  • User override dates show to students in the Timeline block, marked as 'override' 
  • Group override dates don't currently show to students

Important:
Cut-off date/time setting

If the Cut-off date is not enabled, late submission (after the Due date) is possible.

The images above depict a scenario where students are provided with the exam instructions 2 days before the Due date. The instructions in the assignment description state that ‘late submissions will not be accepted’, so the Cut-off date is the same as the Due date.

For an exam that has a strict time limit (for example, a 3-hour exam), ensure the Cut-off date is set to at least 15 minutes after the Due date to allow for last-minute technical issues. If students submit after the Due date but before the Cut-off date, their exam will be accepted but will be recorded in FLO as being late.


Student view

This is how the assignment displays to students before the Allow submissions from date/time:

take-home exam student view


Engaging content - polling

Students provide responses to questions or surveys. Polling can be synchronous or asynchronous. Synchronous or real-time polling in class allows you to display and analyse the results immediately. Asynchronous polling can be used prior to a teaching session where you collect and analyse results to inform delivery of your class.

Good practice guides and tip sheets

Good practice guides and tip sheets have been developed to support quality in both curriculum design and teaching practice. Good practice guides provide a pedagogical overview and tip sheets provide you with practical strategies and ideas for implementation. Links to polling-related resources are provided below. 

Design principles for creating engaging digital contentSourcing and creating digital content






Active Quiz icon

FLO Active Quiz

Active Quiz is designed for in-class quizzes. The quiz uses questions from the question bank, questions can be timed/not timed, grades are reported back to the Gradebook. You can view student responses in real time to offer in-class discussion about the results. Students can use any device. Group quizzing is supported.

Good for

  • Delivery of time-boxed questions (synchronous)
  • Multiple poll questions in one session where the availability of each question is controlled by the teacher
  • Use in-class to check understanding of materials during presentations to allow for clarification
  • Use in-class to explore class views on issues for discussion

Useful features

  • Active quiz is a synchronous (real-time) timed quiz
  • Multiple choice (MCQ) and True-False questions will generate a dynamic histogram of answers, making them good for polling
  • Functions in group mode
Cautions

  • In a live classroom setting, be careful what your screen is displaying – questions other than MCQ and T/F will display identified student answers
Tips

  • Create a QR code of the Active quiz URL. Insert into your lecture presentation to make it quick and easy for students to access
  • Advise students in advance to have a suitable device. Have students log into FLO at the beginning of the class
Help resources





Choice iconFLO Choice

The Choice activity allows you to ask a question and set up radio buttons which learners can click to make a selection from a number of possible responses. They can choose one or more options, and they can update their selection if you allow them. Choices can be useful as a quick poll to stimulate thinking about a topic, to allow the class to vote on a direction for the course, or to gauge progress.

Good for

  • Asynchronous use (eg asking a question pre-class to explore class views on issues for discussion)
  • Single in-class question where time-boxing of answer is less important
  • Use at beginning of class before presentation commences
  • Use at end of class to determine comprehension

Useful features

  • Designed as a single question asynchronous (not real time, students working on it individually at own pace/time) polling activity
  • Can be used in a live setting (synchronous/real time)
  • Can display a histogram of responses
  • Results can be exported
  • Can be run in group mode
Limitations

  • Teacher will need to refresh their screen to display the choice results
  • Limited layout and styling control
  • Only one question per choice activity
Tips

  • Generate a QR code form the choice URL. Add to lecture slide to take students directly to the poll
  • Advise students in advance to have a suitable device. Have students log into FLO at the beginning of the class
Help resources

 






Feedback iconFLO Feedback

The Feedback activity allows you to create and conduct surveys to collect feedback. Responses can be anonymous. There are a number of question types including MCQ, True/False and free text.
Good for

  • Asking multiple questions, including free text
  • Asking the class what material they would like further clarification on in tutorial or revision sessions

Useful features

  • Can deliver more than one question
  • Designed for surveying, responses can be anonymous
  • Can be used as a live activity in class
  • Results of some question types can be displayed as a histogram
Limitations

  • Teacher needs to refresh the results page to see incoming responses
  • Limited layout and styling control
Tips

  • Create a QR code from the feedback activity's URL. Place the QR code into a lecture slide to make it efficient for students to get to the activity on a mobile device
  • Advise students in advance to have a suitable device. Have students log into FLO at the beginning of the class
Help resources

Quiz - provide quiz feedback at quiz and question level

1. Plan  |   2. Build  |  3. Test   | 4. Administer  |  5. Review  || Support

quiz iconThis entry relates to the Quiz activity.

Providing feedback is an excellent way to increase student engagement when they attempt and review a quiz. Feedback can be customised to address particular student responses to a question, the question more generally, or the total score achieved by the student. It can be delivered during the quiz, after the attempt but before the quiz has closed, or after the quiz has closed. The amount and quality of feedback you provide will depend on the quiz's purpose.  

  • Inclusion and release of feedback can increase the complexity required in quiz set-up. For help, please contact your local eLearning support team.

  • Release of feedback to students is controlled by the quiz Review settings in conjunction with the Question Behavior setting. Please see 'I can't unhide the Grade column for a quiz' (Quiz - troubleshooting entry) for further information.

Good practice guides and tip sheets

Good practice guides and tip sheets have been developed to support quality in both curriculum design and teaching practice. Good practice guides provide a pedagogical overview and tip sheets provide you with practical strategies and ideas for implementation. Links to quiz-related resources are provided below. 

Inspirational and engaged teaching


The three types of feedback – specific, general and overall

  • Specific feedback is feedback specific to, and dependent upon, the response the student gave to a question. It is response-specific.
    Specific feedback is set up at the question level – when creating the question or later by clicking the edit cog  edit cog beside the question

specific feedback set-up

Student view:
specific feedback

  • General feedback is feedback shown to the student after they have completed the question. The same feedback is shown for all students, regardless of the response they gave. You can use the general feedback to give students a fully worked answer and perhaps a link to more information they can use if they did not understand the question.
    General Feedback is set up at the question level – when creating the question or later by clicking the edit cog   edit cog  beside the question

    general feedback

    Student view:
    general feedback - student view

  • Overall feedback is the text that is shown after a quiz has been attempted. By specifying additional grade boundaries (as a percentage or as a number), the text shown can depend on the grade obtained
    Overall Feedback is set up in the quiz's settings 
    In the scenario below, students scoring between 100% and 80% will see the message 'Well done'.  Those who scored between 79.99% and 0% will see            the message 'Please study this week's work again' (100% and 0% do not need to be entered, as they are the default grade boundaries):

overall feedback overall feedback

Student view:
overall feedback - student view


Database - main entry

Using a database activity in your topic is one way to allow students to create content and share it with others. Using the Database activity in a topic ideally consists of 5 stages, in a looped process.

1. Plan  |  2. Build  |  3. Test  |  4. Administer  |  5. Review  ||  Support 
  Database iconThe database activity allows teachers and students to build up a bank of structured information (a 'collection'). A database activity could be used:

  • as a collaborative collection of web links, books, book reviews, journal references etc
  • to display student-created photos, posters, websites or text for peer comment and review.
Using a database in your topic is a way to allow students to create content ('entries') and interact with others (collaborate). Students have the opportunity to teach and learn from their peers by making considered decisions about resources that require critical thinking, and supporting their choices through debate (comments). As well as being a resource in the current topic, the content created can become a legacy or resource/exemplar for another (future) topic (ie it can be rolled over).

The database entries need to be exported/imported separately if you want to use the database in another site (eg the topic's next version) – only the database shell will be copied over. Contact your eLearning support team.

Good practice guides and tip sheets

Good practice guides and tip sheets have been developed to support quality in both curriculum design and teaching practice. Good practice guides provide a pedagogical overview and tip sheets provide you with practical strategies and ideas for implementation. Links to database-related resources are provided below. 

Providing constructive feedback in FLO



    1. Plan

    The success of the database activity is in the planning. Once students begin adding content (entries), it can be tricky to change the fields, so thinking ahead is key. 

    What is the intended purpose of the database activity? 

    • What fields/questions do you want your students to answer? What format – uploading images or documents? Links? What fields are required/optional?
    • How does it link to assessment – is it an assessment item itself, or is it a step towards an assessment item (eg resource supporting assessment, digital literacy skill development)?
    • How interactive do you want the activity to be? Allow comments on entries (moderated/unmoderated)? Students/teachers rate entries? Ratings can be aggregated to form a final grade which is recorded in the Gradebook.

    The structure of the entries is defined by the teacher as a number of fields. The visual layout of information when listing, viewing or editing database entries is  controlled by templates

    When creating a database for the first time, it can be helpful to think about it like an Excel spreadsheet. The teacher creates the columns (fields), and students and/or teachers add rows of content.


    2. Build

    Once you have planned your database fields, you are ready to set up your database.

      1. Create a database activity (settings)
      2. Define database fields (preset, create your own, make your database searchable)
      3. Customise the templates (View list, View single, Add entry)

      3. Test

      The database activity is a highly customisable and very versatile tool, so it's important to test what you've built thoroughly before releasing the activity to students. Ask your local eLearning support team to check your Database for you (especially if this is your first time). It is best to amend mistakes before students add entries.

      • Practice creating an entry – as a form of scaffolding, you could support students by showing what an entry that's added looks like
      • Preview the Single, List, and Add views – is the layout is clear and easy to understand?


      4. Administer

      When setting up your database activity, you can enable a number of optional settings. Some of these settings require administration by a teacher:

      • Approve entries – If enabled, entries require approving by a teacher before they are viewable by everyone
      • Give ratings to entries – if ratings are being used for marking (settings)

      To encourage students to add entries, you could add an initial entry to model good practice, setting a standard and ensuring that instructions are not misunderstood. You could add the first entry in the Test phase). This is equivalent to making the first post in a forum. The fields you set up when you built the database will also prompt students as to what to add to create an entry. Students like examples and will engage more promptly with the tool.

      You can see how many students have contributed on the topic homepage:
      database contributions


      5. Review

      How did your database activity go? Would you set up the activity differently next time round? Talk to colleagues and/or your local eLearning support team to get ideas for improvement.

      If you are happy with the activity and you want to use the content in a future topic version/other topics, you can ask your eLearning support team to roll over or import the database activity. The entries will need to be exported/imported separately. 


        Training and support

        Troubleshooting

      Support

      eLearning support teams

      There are no known issues with this tool, but you may require help to build it.

      Video - options for recording guest lectures

      1. Plan  |   2. Build   |  3. Test   |  4. Administer  |  5. Review  ||   Support  

      This entry relates to a range of tools used to build videos

      Most of our resources are designed to help you make videos for your topics. This entry is to help guest lecturers make videos for topics they don't have access to. Because guest lecturers may be from outside the University this page includes programs that Flinders does not support, as most of our supported programs would need to be purchased. We have included links to help documentation for all programs included below.

      Good practice guides and tip sheets

      Good practice guides and tip sheets have been developed to support quality in both curriculum design and teaching practice. Good practice guides provide a pedagogical overview and tip sheets provide you with practical strategies and ideas for implementation. Links to lecture recording-related resources are provided below. 

      Making the most of your lecture recording



        Scenario 1: The speaker is from outside Flinders University

        Option 1: They use a program they are comfortable with

        If they already have a program they already use in their workplace (a strong possibility if they are from another university), they can use that.

        Once they've recorded the video they can upload it to a cloud storage service like OneDrive, Google Drive or Dropbox and share a link for you to download the video. You can then upload it to My Media.


        Option 2: They may have access to program that will create a video

        There are some commonly available programs that can produce video:

        PowerPoint:


        Keynote (Macs only)
        How To Export A Keynote Presentation As A QuickTime Video – With A Voiceover (you'll need to scroll down the page a little to see these steps)

        Mobile phone

        If they are only recording themselves speaking they can record themselves on their mobile phone, and upload it to a cloud storage service like OneDrive, Google Drive or Dropbox and share a link for you to download the video. You can then upload the video to My Media.

        They could also use their phone to record an audio recording, which you can also upload in My Media.


        Option 3: Film them on campus

        If it is convenient for them to come to campus you can film them in a quite spot on campus using your phone, or record them in the Multimedia recording studio. You can then upload the video to My Media.

        Teaching spaces equipped with recording facilities can be used to record video and other presentations.


        Option 4: Record a Collaborate session
        Guest lecturers can record video in Collaborate without needing a FAN. The methods we've mentioned above facilitate a more polished video but this will do when no other alternatives are available.



        Scenario 2: The speaker is from Flinders, but does not have access to your topic.

        Option 1: Kaltura or Camtasia

        Kaltura and Camtasia are the video-creation programs supported by Flinders University.

        • Kaltura can record your webcam and your screen, and is easy to use (it's great for voice over PowerPoint). They can then make you a collaboratoron the video so you can edit/publish it.
        • Camtasia has a wider range of features but is more complex to use.

        Option 2: Film them on campus

        You could film them in a quite spot on campus using your phone, or record them in the Multimedia recording studio. You can then upload the video to My Media.

        Teaching spaces equipped with recording facilities can be used to record video and other presentations.


        Option 3: Other programs

        Please note that the following options are not supported by the eLearning teams.

        Staff could use the either of the following programs, upload it to My Media, then make you a co-publisher so you can add it to your FLO site.

        PowerPoint


        Keynote (Macs only)
        How To Export A Keynote Presentation As A QuickTime Video – With A Voiceover (you'll need to scroll down the page a little to see these steps)

        Forum / Announcements - create separate discussion forums for groups in a topic

        1. Plan  |  2. Build  |  3. Test  |  4. Administer  |  5. Review  ||  Support

        forum iconThis entry relates to the Forum activity.

        You can create separate discussion forums for groups of students in a single forum activity (you don't need to create a separate forum activity for each group).

        Note: Before creating your group discussion forum, you will need to organise your students into groups and add these groups to a grouping

        Good practice guides and tip sheets

        Good practice guides and tip sheets have been developed to support quality in both curriculum design and teaching practice. Good practice guides provide a pedagogical overview and tip sheets provide you with practical strategies and ideas for implementation. Links to group-related resources are provided below. 

        Group work 

         


        Create a group discussion forum

        1. Turn editing on 

        2. In the module where you want to create the forum, click Add an activity or resource  

        3. From the Activities tab, select Forum 

        4. Give the forum a Name and Description

        5. Apply other settings as necessary (see Set up a forum)

        6. Under Common module settings, change Group mode to Separate groups to give each group their own private forum, or Visible groups to create a forum for each group and allow other groups to view (but not post to)
          Group mode setting

          For the Grouping setting, select the grouping containing the groups you want to use for the forum
          Grouping setting

        7. Click Save and display

        Assignment - purpose and settings

        1. Plan  |   2. Build   |  3. Test   | 4. Administer   |  5. Review  ||  Support

        Good practice guides and tip sheets

        Good practice guides and tip sheets have been developed to support quality in both curriculum design and teaching practice. Good practice guides provide a pedagogical overview and tip sheets provide you with practical strategies and ideas for implementation. Links to assignment-related resources are provided below. 

        Designing assessment | Rubrics and marking guides in FLO | Scaffolding assessment in FLO

        assignment dropbox iconThe following assignment setting guides focus on ways you might want to use the Assignment activity.


        Blog - main entry

        Blogs are a specific type of social networking tool which is presented as a website with regular entries including commentary, descriptions and links to digital resources such as videos and images.  Using the blog activity in a topic ideally consists of 5 stages.

        1. Plan  |  2. Build  |   3. Administer  |  4. Review  ||  Support 
        blog icon

        The blog tool in FLO (OU blog) is intuitive for users (there is a 'New blog post' prompt and the user can use the HTML editor to add/edit their post entry). Blogs are usually organised as a chronological series of postings created by the author/s of the blog (the student/s). 

        You may want to prompt students what to blog about (this might be assessment information), either in the introduction or somewhere else in the FLO site depending on the blog's purpose. A blog can be used for formative assessment (eg reflections) or summative assessment (eg a final account of their learning).

        Good practice guides and tip sheets

        Good practice guides and tip sheets have been developed to support quality in both curriculum design and teaching practice. Good practice guides provide a pedagogical overview and tip sheets provide you with practical strategies and ideas for implementation. Links to blog-related resources are provided below. 

        Inspirational and engaged teachingProviding constructive feedback in FLO | Communication, interaction and collaboration tools in FLO

         


        1. Plan

        What is the purpose of the blog – what do you want students to do using this tool? 

        • Do you want the blog to be private (separate individual blog) or public (visible individual blog, or blog together)? 
        • Is the blog a task that students will do iteratively during the semester, or will it fall within a set timeframe
        These are some of the questions to ask before you set up the tool. As a teacher, you can view participation in the blog and grade it.



        2. Build

        Once you have determined your blog's purpose, you can set it up. 

        1. Click Turn editing on button



        2. Click Add an activity or resource to open the Activity Chooser


        3. Click the OU blog icon

        4. You will be taken to the Adding a new OU blog screen where you can set the parameters of your blog.

        5. Give the blog a Name and Introduction.

        6. If desired, use the Individual blogs drop-down menu to select individual blogs. If individual blogs are not required, leave this menu at the default no (blog together or in groups)
          Individual blog options

        7. Click the Save and display button
          Timeline block: The Blog tool does not show to students in the Timeline block.



        3. Administer

        To administer the blog you can view how users are participating, as well as set up a grade for the blog.


        View the participation of a user
        1. Click into the module from the topic homepage

        2. Click Participation by user
          Click participation by user
        3. To limit participation by date, click enable and select dates.  Click Update.
          click to enable dates

        4. Results will display below.  
          Click Details beside user name to view that user's posts and comments.
          Click for details
        5. Use tabs to toggle view between posts and comments
          view posts
          view comments


          Grade a blog activity

          1. Open the blog and click on the Click Participation by user button
            participation by user button

          2. Select a grade from the drop-down menu in one of the following two locations

            In the display, all users view, select a grade for each student from the drop-down menu. Click Save changes
            select grade from drop-down menu

            OR

            Click on the details link beside the user name.  Select the User grade tab, select grade then click Save changes
            select the user grade tab

          4. Review

          Having used the blog activity in your topic, you can now ask these questions:

          • Was it an effective activity (did it achieve what you wanted it to?)
          • Did students benefit from using the blog?
          • Did students give you feedback about blog use (eg using the feedback activity)? Did they have problems with it?
          The answers to these and other questions may help you refine the activity in the next iteration of your topic, or you may decide to use another tool.

            Training and support

            Troubleshooting

          Training/Support

          Contact your local eLearning support team

          No known issues with this tool

          Topic administration - non-award (short) courses

          1. Build  |   2. Settings   |  3. Editing   | 4. User management   |  5. Reports   ||  Support  

          Good practice guides and tip sheets

          Good practice guides and tip sheets have been developed to support quality in both curriculum design and teaching practice. Good practice guides provide a pedagogical overview and tip sheets provide you with practical strategies and ideas for implementation. Links to assignment-related resources are provided below.

          Supporting students to successfully engage with the topic | Culturally responsive digital learning

          This entry relates to topic administration.

          It is possible to create a non-award (short) course in FLO using existing infrastructure. FLO can provide the same functionality to deliver non-award (short) courses as is available for award topics. The key difference is because non-award (short) courses do not exist in 'upstream' systems, eg. Student Management System, then some process is less automated than what is possible for award topics. This page outlines what is available in FLO to support non-award (short) courses. 


          The Online Learning and Teaching team can assist with:

          • Learning design advice (course structure, content and strategies)
          • Creation of FLO site
          • Assigning 'category administrator' access (so that someone can add students to FLO sites)
          • Rolling over a site for a new cohort
          • Skills development support
          Please note that other elements such as advertising, enquiries, admission, enrolment, payment, identity management, student support and completion will need to be arranged with your College.


          1. New courses: Request learning design advice (contact your local Learning Designer)
          • Advice on course structure

            Discuss options for how the course is structured, how you want participants to engage with the digital learning environment and how completions will be administered.

          • Advice on content and strategies
            You can create the non-award (short) course using the standard FLO tools and activities, curate outside sites in the FLO site, or embed SCORM (Shareable Content Object Reference Model) packages into FLO. Advice is focused on the tools within the FLO ‘ecosystem’. It may be possible to transfer existing content into FLO if existing online courses are hosted on Moodle platforms. 

          2. Create FLO site (Service One request
          • FLO site creation
            The Online Learning and Teaching (OLT) team can create a FLO site for your non-award (short) course. This may consist of a single site, a series of discreet sites, or linked sites. We can advise you, dependent on your requirements.

          • Category Administrator role assigned
            One person can be enrolled as the site/s owner, with the Category Administrator role, enabling them to manage access to the FLO site. Once participants in a course have been assigned a FAN, and once they have activated the FAN, they can be granted access to the FLO site.
          Manual enrolment with FAN (College administration responsibility)
          FAN sponsors are staff members authorised to request the creation of FANs for non-award students. AccessNow allows the creation of FAN accounts by sponsors. See existing sponsors on the Find a sponsor in your area (login) page, or contact IDS (8201 2345 or Service One) and request to be added to as a sponsor. More information on how to create a FAN is available on the AccessNow website.
          • Repeat site for a new cohort
            If the course will be run in several iterations, content from the existing FLO site can be 'rolled' into a new site for each new iteration. This strategy enables you to manage cohorts discretely. The alternative is to manage existing and new enrolments within the one FLO site. 

          3. Skills development  
          • Skills development
            Online Learning and Teaching teams can provide workshops and 1:1 support for staff who will be developing and teaching using the FLO sites. Please note that the Online Learning and Teaching team are not resourced to build FLO sites for non-award (short) courses. 
           

          eLearning equipment booking store

          The eLearning store is an online booking system for all Flinders staff.

          1. Bookings  |  2. Equipment ||  Support 

          The eLearning store is an online booking system for all Flinders staff where they can book equipment for short loan periods (from one hour to a few weeks)


          1. Bookings

          The eLearning store is available at https://elearningstore.flinders.edu.au 
          It is available for all Flinders staff (academic or professional) and uses Okta to authenticate.

          2. Equipment

          Items that can be booked include:

          • COWS (Computer on Wheels - trolley containing 12 or 14 PC or Mac laptops)
          • CALF (smaller COW - trolley containing 6 PC laptops)
          • Laptops (PC)
          • Voice recorders
          • iPads
          • Microphones
          • Video cameras
          • Tripods
          • Web cam/USB headset kits
          • Catchboxes
          • Wireless presenters
          • Video projectors
          • PA amp
          • Portable green screens

          Video chat kits are also available for booking. These include:

          • 2 web chat kits (consisting of a webcam and USB headset)
          • 1 web group chat kit (consisting of a webcam and a Bluetooth microphone / speaker)
          The following equipment is also available:
          • 2 USB microphones
          • Wireless Go Compact Microphone System
          • 3 Lapel mic kits

          These kits are available for loan to academic staff for use in desktop video conferencing, virtual classroom sessions (eg Collaborate) or recording short videos for FLO.

          You can book the kits via the online store.


            Training and support

            Troubleshooting

          Support

          Contact you local eLearning support team

          No known issues with this tool


          Topic administration - preview as a student (switch role to)

          1. Build  |   2. Settings   |  3. Editing   | 4. User management   |  5. Reports   ||  Support  

          This entry relates to styles and layout, topic administration, and any situation where you set up activities and resources.

          FLO allows you to preview your content and activities as a student would. This is particularly useful when checking the setup and design of your topic (the building and testing phases).



          Steps

          1. In your topic, in the top toolbar, open the drop-down menu next to your name/login
            Profile drop-down menu

          2. Click Switch role to...
            Switch role to

          3. In the next screen, select Student from the list (note that this view may not be perfect – see Moodle: Switch roles for more information) 
            Student role 

          4. You will notice that Student appears under your profile name. You can now navigate around your site as a student would.
            Student role applied

          5. To return to your normal role, click the Return to my normal role link under the drop-down My FLO menu
            Return to normal role


          If an activity or a module has group restrictions, you won't be able to access it if you switch your role to a student, as those restrictions will apply to you too. Hence, if there are restrictions based on groups, you should add yourself to that particular group for a complete student experience. This should be done prior to switching your role to a student.

          Advice

          • Student Two groups are synchronised regularly, and you will be automatically unenrolled from those groups each time it runs. This doesn't apply to a 'User-created group'.
          • Student Two groups syncing starts at 20 to the hour, every hour and can take up to 15 minutes, so the best timeframe is the first 40 minutes of the hour. Attempting this in the last 20 minutes of the hour will work, but you may be unenrolled mid testing.


          Video - add captions

          1. Plan  |   2. Build  |  3. Test   | 4. Administer  |  5. Review  ||  Support 

          My Media iconThis entry relates to Kaltura, the video platform in FLO, and how to add captions to a video you've already uploaded


          Why use captions?

          In addition to being an important requirement for accessibility, captions have been shown to be beneficial for the learning of all students.  

          A study conducted by Oregon State University in 2015 found that "more than half of students are using closed captions in their educational videos at least sometimes" and that students who did not report having disabilities "use captions almost as frequently as those who did". The respondents in the study "expressed strong agreement that captions help [them] focus, retain information, and overcome poor audio", that captions were "helpful learning aids" and that they helped "students with comprehension, accuracy, engagement, and the retention of information transmitted in course videos." (Read more about the study in this Educause review article, or find the full study.)

          You're able to add captions to all videos in Kaltura. However, if you're working with a student who has a Disability Access Plan (DAP), you should seek advice from a Disability Advisor at Health Counselling and Disability Services to discuss the student's needs and whether particular captioning services or requirements are included in the student's DAP. 


          Steps to request machine generated captions for a video

          The Kaltura video platform in FLO allows you to to request machine generated captions. Once you make a request, the captions are added to your video within approximately 30 minutes. 

          1. Log into FLO. You can add captions to the uploaded video in either:
            • your My Media repository: in the FLO navigation bar across the top of screen, open the drop-down menu next to your name and profile picture, then click My Media
            • the topic Media Vault, if you have published it there: open the topic, click the Navigation menu, then open the Media Vault (you'll find it after all the topic modules). 

          2. From the list of media, find the video you want to have captioned. Click its title to open. 
            Open video to caption

          3. Under the video, click the Actions drop-down menu and select Captions Requests.
            Action dropdwon open with caption request selected

          4. From the drop-down menus, select Service> Machine and Language >English, then click Submit
            Select Machine and English and submit

          5. You'll see a notification that your request is pending.


          6. Wait for around 30 minutes for the machine-generated captions to appear. Unfortunately, you don't get a notification when they arrive so you should check back after half an hour. One way to know they've arrived is that on your My Media or Media Vault entries page, auto-generated tags will appear next to the video.


          7. Open and play the video to review the caption quality. You'll notice:
            •  the video dimensions have changed slightly to accommodate the caption text
            •  a CC icon is now shown on the player. Use it to toggle the captions on/off
            • Show transcript button appears under the video. Click it to display the entire caption transcript. As the video plays, the relevant section of text is highlighted. 
            • The transcript can be downloaded as a text file. You could format this transcript and upload to FLO as a PDF.
           

          You can edit the captions to fix any inaccuracies – see below. 



          Steps to edit machine generated captions

          Once the captions been attached to your video, you should edit them for accuracy. At the moment the machine-generated captions have an accuracy rate of about 70%. 

          The caption accuracy will vary depending on things like:

          • how often you use acronyms or slang
          • how much subject specific terminology or jargon you use
          • your accent (the AI is currently best with American accents. If you have an Australian accent, you may find it struggles with the letter R)

          1. Open the video from your list of media entries in My Media or the topic Media Vault, by clicking its title to open. 

          2. Under the video, click the Actions drop-down menu and select Captions Requests.
            Actions dropdownwith captions requests selected

          3. You'll see your caption request with a status of Completed. Click the Edit icon (pencil) to open the caption editor.
            click the pencil icon

          4. The Closed Captions Editor opens, and from here you'll have the options here to adjust the caption text in a couple of different ways. 
            Closed Captions editor interface

          5. You can simply click a caption to open the text box, and type in / delete text as necessary. When you're finished within each caption textbox, just click away from it to close it. 
            editing caption text

          6. There's also a very handy Search and Replace feature that lets you correct multiple transcription errors quickly, much like the one in Word. If the caption text repeatedly has error for the same word (eg as in the examples below where FLO was always transcribed as flow, and invigilation was always transcribed as visualization), then enter the wrongly-transcribed word in the Search in Captions field, enter the correct word in the Replace with field, then click Replace. It'll change them all.
            Search and replace fields empty
             examples:
            search and replace tool

          7. Please note, there is no auto saving. If you have a long transcript, save it regularly to avoid session timeout. Click Save then Yes when prompted to confirm.
            Save caption edits  Confirm save caption edits

          8. If you've finished editing the captions and are ready to return to the video, click Back in the top right of screen.
            Back button


          Steps to delete a caption file

          If you want to delete the entire caption file from a video, you can do this but be aware that you cannot recover or re-order those captions once deleted. Depending on why you're deleting the captions, it may be a good idea to download and keep a copy of the file, in case you want to re-upload them in future. 

          To download the caption file (in case of future use)

          1. Open the video from your list of media entries in My Media or the topic Media Vault, by clicking its title to open. 
          2. Under the video, click the Actions drop-down menu and select Edit.
          3. Open the Captions tab. You'll see the captions file listed. To the right, there's a series of Action icons. Click the download icon
            download v ideo captions

          4. The caption file downloads in .srt format. Save it somewhere with your teaching resources in case you need it for future use. 

          Note: if you want to delete immediately after downloading, skip to step 3 below. 


          To delete the caption file

          1. Open the video from the My Media or the topic Media Vault  by clicking its title.
          2. From the Actions drop-down menu, click Edit.
          3. Open the Captions tab. You'll see the captions file listed. In the Action icons section, click Delete (cross icon).
            delete captions

          4. On the confirmation pop-up, click Delete to confirm. 
            confirm delete captions

          5. The file will be removed from the Captions tab. 


          What to do if you've deleted the caption track and need to reinstate it

          If you accidentally delete the caption track, at the moment you cannot reorder the machine generated captions within the tool. 

          If you go back into the Captions Request section (via the Actions drop-down menu), you'll still see the previous caption order you submitted. Although the request is listed here, you can't recover the captions. This listing is now simply a record of the request and you'll notice that the status indicator next to Completed is red, not green. If you try to re-order the caption track, you'll see this error message:

          error message for reordering captions


          You now have two options if you need to reinstate the caption file:

          • If you didn't download a copy of the captions file prior to deleting it, you'll need to re-upload the video using the replace  video tool , then order the captions for the newly uploaded version (as per the steps above).

          • If you downloaded and saved a copy of the original captions .srt file before deleting, you can just re-upload this in Captions Tab in Edit mode.
          1. Open the video from your list of entries in My Media or the topic Media Vault by clicking its title.
          2. From the Actions drop-down menu, click Edit.
          3. Click the Captions tab then click Upload captions file.
            click upload captions file

          4. Follow the prompts in the pop-up window to browse and find the saved .srt file on your computer and upload it, select the language and save.
            upload prompts for caption file

          5. You'll see the captions file listed in the Captions tab, and it'll be added back in to the video. Note: You cannot edit these captions via the Caption Editor.
            captions uploaded

          Feedback - Touchpoint survey

          1. Plan  |  2. Build  |  3. Test  |  4. Administer  |  5. Review  ||  Support 

          Feedback activityThis entry relates to the Feedback activity.

          The Touchpoint survey is a short survey designed as a ‘snapshot’ to provide formative feedback about student learning. The survey can be added to your topic early, mid and late (eg weeks 3- 4, 7, 11 or equivalent, depending on the topic structure), or just once in the topic. It prompts students to voluntarily and anonymously give feedback about their experience of the topic so far. 

          The questions are:

          • How are you going with this topic so far?
          • Is there any topic content (covered so far) that is not clear to you?
          • Are you having any difficulties with the topic? If so, what?
          • Could anything be improved about this topic or the teaching?

          These questions can be easily altered to suit your needs. The data provides formative feedback about where students are at, to allow adequate time to make changes to teaching if needed. It also helps reinforce that students are an active part of their own learning. The data from the survey remains with (is stored in) the topic.


          Use the Touchpoint survey in your FLO site

          1. Make a request to your local eLearning support team to have the tool added to your FLO site
          2. Unhide the tool (you can also edit/add questions if you like)
          3. Prompt students to use it via an announcement
          4. Later, click into it and check responses using the Show responses tab at the top (in the Analysis tab you can also Export to Excel)
          5. Think about what the results means for topic design and teaching
          6. Thank students and summarise your response via another announcement (to reward their efforts)
          7. Make any adjustments to the topic accordingly

          Glossary - main entry

          Using the glossary activity in a topic ideally consists of 4 stages, in a looped process.

          1. Plan  |  2. Build  |  3. Test  |  4. Administer  | |  Support 

          glossary iconGlossaries give students the opportunity to create their own content and are a powerful tool for critical thinking, collaboration and sharing. 

          The glossary can also become a legacy or resource for future topics. It is a product that could potentially be converted into a publishable resource (eg create your own textbook). 

          Good practice guides and tip sheets

          Good practice guides and tip sheets have been developed to support quality in both curriculum design and teaching practice. Good practice guides provide a pedagogical overview and tip sheets provide you with practical strategies and ideas for implementation. Links to teaching-related resources are provided below. 

          Facilitating Student-Teacher interaction in FLO


          1. Plan your glossary

          The glossary tool enables participants (students) to create and maintain a list of definitions or to collect and organise resources/information. If the glossary auto-linking filter is enabled, entries will be automatically linked where the concept works and/or phrases appear within the topic.

          A teacher can allow comments on entries (eg peer review, additional information). Entries can also be rated by teachers or students (peer evaluation). Ratings can be aggregated to form a final grade which is recorded in the Gradebook.

          Glossaries have many uses, such as:

          • a collaborative bank of key terms
          • a 'getting to know you' space where new students add their name and key details
          • a 'handy tips' resource of best practice in a practical subject
          • a sharing area of useful videos, images or sound files
          • a revision resource of facts to remember


          2. Build your glossary

          You have planned your glossary. Now you are ready to set up your glossary. Students will be able to create an entry and add comments (if you choose Yes), but will not be able to rate an entry without further steps (see Glossary - optional settings).

          Create a glossary activity
          1. In the topic, click Turn editing on 
             
          2. In the week/module where you want to add the glossary, click Add an activity or resource  


          3. Select Glossary and click Add

          4. Give the glossary a Name and Description

          5. Under Entries, amongst other options you can choose to allow comments (default is No)
            allow comments

          6. Under Appearance, select Display format. There are 7 display formats: 
            • Simple, dictionary style - No authors are displayed and attachments are shown as links
            • Continuous without author - Entries are displayed one after another without any separation apart from the editing icons
            • Full with author - A forum-like display format showing the author's data and with attachments shown as links
            • Full without author - A forum-like display format without authors and with attachments shown as links
            • Encyclopedia - As for "Full with author" but attached images are shown inline
            • Entry list - Concepts are listed as links
            • FAQ - The words QUESTION and ANSWER are appended to the concept and definition respectively  



              Timeline block: Using the 'Expect completed on' date in the Activity completion section will show a date to students in the Timeline block.

          7. Click the Save and display button

          8. Click on the Browse by category tab (1), then the Edit categories button (2). Adding categories to a glossary means you can apply them to entries (and have more than one) which makes for easier searching/navigation
            Clicking on the 'browse by category' tab brings the 'edit categories' button 

          9. Click Add Category, and name your category

            The settings described in this step and the step below.

          10. Use the Automatically link this category drop-down menu to select whether or not you would like to automatically link the category. For more information about auto-linking, see Set up auto-linking in a glossary entry

          11. Click on the Save changes button. Repeat steps 9 & 10 as required (you can also return to this at any time).

          12. The categories you create will allow users the option to browse by the glossary by category
          Optional settings

          See the following links for more options about using the Glossary activity:



          3. Test your glossary

          To make sure your glossary works as expected, create a test entry (this can be deleted once you are happy with the result).

          Add a glossary entry

          1. Click the Add a new entry button

          2. Fill in the required fields

          3. Click Save changes 

          4. Once your entry has been added, try searching for the entry. In the search box type in the name of your entry

          5. Click search
            search glossary box

          6.  Your entry should now appear. To delete the entry press the trash icon. You can also preview the content by previewing it as a student.


          4. Administer your glossary

          In order to administer your glossary, you can use a variety of functions (listed below). You can moderate entries, set up ratings, import and export entries.

          The export and import items are near the bottom of the list. In this picture they are marked with a red border.Export and import glossary entries

          When a topic is rolled over, only the settings are copied over - glossary entries (like most student contributions) are not included. However, you can export the entries from one glossary and import them to another (eg. if you have a glossary of relevant terms/definitions). To do this:

          1. Open the glossary you wish to export entries from

          2. Click on the cog in the top right corner of the glossary tool, and select Export entries

          3. Click the Export entries to file button, and when prompted, save the file.

          4. Open the glossary you wish to import entries into.

          5. Click on the cog in the top right corner of the glossary tool, and select Import entries. Whoever does the importing will be listed as the author of all the imported entries.

          6. Upload the glossary, choose the destination of the imported entries (either the glossary you are in or a new glossary), and tick the import categories box (if needed).

          You are advised to request support from your local eLearning support team to do this, as there are some considerations/limitations to this process. For example, the following features cannot be imported:

          • Student-created entries – their names will not come across (a good thing)
          • Comments on entries
          • Unused categories



            Training and support

            Troubleshooting

          Support

          Contact your local eLearning support team 

          Blocks - main entry

          Blocks are a navigational tool in your topic and can provide quick links/access points for students.

          1. Plan  |  2. Build  ||  Support 

          Blocks appear in the Topic Blocks menu in the top right corner of each FLO site. 'Topic Links' is a standard block, with links to topic information, grades, SETs etc. Different kinds of blocks can be added (eg Activities, Teaching team, Upcoming events), or you can add an HTML block and use it to feature the textbook/s or for some other topic-related purpose.  


          Good practice guides and tip sheets

          Good practice guides and tip sheets have been developed to support quality in both curriculum design and teaching practice. Good practice guides provide a pedagogical overview and tip sheets provide you with practical strategies and ideas for implementation. Links to teaching-related resources are provided below. 

          Facilitating Student-Teacher interaction in FLO


          1. Plan

          Some blocks are standard in topics, as part of the college template or starter site. Others you will need to add yourself. You can also move blocks up/down to emphasise important ones.

          The Activities block is particularly useful if you have lots of activities and resources in your topic, as it is a navigational tool for students.

          Types of blocks
          Block name Description
          Activities Lists all activities used in the topic, with links to show all activities of each type
          Attendance Provides a link to the attendance register. Requires the Attendance activity
          Comments Allows students to post comments on the page. Comments will be visible to all users in the topic
          Completion progress The Completion Progress is a time-management tool for students. It visually shows what activities/resources a student is supposed to interact within a course. It is colour-coded so students can quickly see what they have and have not completed/viewed.
          Engagement analytics Moodle Engagement Analytics allows you to easily track student engagement on Moodle against three different indicators of progress. The analytics examines how much students are engaging in: Forum activity. Login frequency.
          Feedback Provides a link to provide feedback. Requires the Feedback activity
          HTML Allows you to enter custom text, links and images
          Inactive user alert
          The Inactive users alert block allows instructors to create alerts per course to determine if students have not accessed the course or important activities by specific dates
          Lecture recordings Provides a link to the lecture management interface (QStream)
          Logged in user Shows the current logged in user (you)
          Messages Links to the Messages tool
          Module links Provides a table of contents of modules in the topic
          People Links to the Participants tool
          Quiz results Shows results from quizzes in the topic
          Random glossary entry Shows a random glossary entry. Requires the Glossary tool
          Recent activity Shows the most recent activity in the topic
          Remote RSS feed Allows you to import RSS feeds from external websites
          Search forums Provides a tool to search all forums in the topic
          Self completion Displays progress on self completion in the topic
          Timeline  Shows students upcoming due dates
          Upcoming events Shows calendar events for the next 7 days


          2. Build

          Add blocks to your topic
          1. In your topic, click Turn editing on
            turn editing on button
          2. Locate the Add a block menu (usually on the right-hand side)
            add a block menu
          3. Select the type of block you wish to add


          Add a teaching team block

          The teaching team block lists the names, photos and optionally contact details of the teaching team. Your block is included in the FLO sites so you will not have to create it yourself unless it has been deleted. 

          Note: To add/alter your profile picture displayed in the Welcome block, see how do I upload a profile photo.

          1. In your topic, click the Turn editing on button

          2. Open the Topic blocks menu

          3. Locate the Add a block dropdown menu (usually on the right-hand side) and select Topic welcome
            select topic welcome from the add a block menu
          4. When the new block appears, click the cog icon to configure the block (see more information below)


          5. In block title, add the text 'Teaching team'

          6. In Roles to display, tick 'topic coordinator', 'teacher' and 'tutor'.

          7. To show more contact methods change the Contact methods to display options.

          8. In Course welcome text

            If your topic uses the starter site, enter a space into the text box. If you want to introduce yourself to students, use a welcome video instead

            If your topic is not yet using the starter site, you can add some introductory text for students here. Try to keep the text short – if you have a lot of content, consider using a welcome video or page resource instead.

          9. When you have finished configuring the block, click Save changes

          Change your user image (via the Topic welcome block)
          1. If you have previously uploaded a profile image, it will automatically display in the welcome block. To add or change your user image, click the edit your profile here link in the block
            follow the 'edit your profile here' link 
          2. Upload your user image clicking the Add button or by dragging and dropping the file into the area indicated
            upload your image
            display of a newly added image

          3. Click Update profile

          4. Your chosen image will now appear in the Welcome block, in addition to many other locations in FLO (eg forum posts)
            a welcome block complete with user image

            Training and support

            Troubleshooting

          Training/Support

          Contact your local eLearning support teams

          No known issues with this tool

          Topic administration - Student equivalent (was Auditing student) in FLO

          1. Build  |   2. Settings   |  3. Editing   | 4. User management   |  5. Reports   ||  Support  

          Good practice guides and tip sheets

          Good practice guides and tip sheets have been developed to support quality in both curriculum design and teaching practice. Good practice guides provide a pedagogical overview and tip sheets provide you with practical strategies and ideas for implementation. Links to assignment-related resources are provided below.

          Culturally responsive digital learning | Supporting students to successfully engage with the topic

          This entry relates to topic administration

          In FLO the role of auditing student has been renamed to ‘Student equivalent’, in order to try to avoid confusion. The term auditing student has a very specific meaning. According to policy, auditing students are not permitted access to FLO. Therefore, asking for someone to be given access to FLO as an auditing student is a conflicting request.

          The ‘student equivalent’ role has the same permissions in FLO as a student role. Requests for users to be added to FLO topics using the ‘student equivalent’ role can be sent to your college eLearning support team via Service One.

          ‘Student equivalent’ may be an appropriate role to assign in the following situations:

          • Demo student for testing / reviewing purposes
          • A student completing a research project who may benefit from access to teaching materials
          • Students listed as ‘Incomplete’ who may benefit from access to teaching materials
          • Temporary access to a past topic for students repeating that topic
          • Access for RPL requirements
          • Access to an undergraduate topic for a postgraduate student

          Additional references

          Assignment - download assignment submissions/feedback files and grading worksheet (offline marking)

          1. Plan  |   2. Build  |  3. Test   | 4. Administer  |  5. Review  || Support

          Good practice guides and tip sheets

          Good practice guides and tip sheets have been developed to support quality in both curriculum design and teaching practice. Good practice guides provide a pedagogical overview and tip sheets provide you with practical strategies and ideas for implementation. Links to assignment-related resources are provided below. 

          Providing constructive feedback in FLO |  Rubrics and marking guides in FLO | Scaffolding assessment in FLO | Marking in FLO using the assignment tool

          assignment iconThis entry relates to the Assignment activity.

          If you are marking offline (having set this up when you created the Assignment activity), there is a 3-step process: download (internet access required), mark (no internet access required – this is the 'offline' part), upload (internet access required). 

          Your options in the drop-down menu for 'Grading action' will depend on how you have set up the assignment.


          Download assignment submissions for marking offline

          1. Open the assignment

          2. Scroll down and click the View all submissions button
            View all submissions button

          3. Select Download all submissions from the Grading action menu (at the top of the screen)
            Download all submissions

            If a filter is selected, only the students in that group will be visible and be downloaded. There are two types of filters:

            Group filters are at the top of the screen
            Group filter

            Status filters are at the bottom of the screen under Options
            Status filter

            To download specific submissions, select them by ticking the checkbox beside the relevant student's name – filters may still be used, but each required item must be checked. Then, use the With selected... drop-down menu at the bottom of the screen and select Download selected submissions
            download single assignments
            To download a single submission, first open the required document by clicking on it. Choose Save as to save a copy to your preferred location. This file will not be zipped, so extraction will not be necessary.

          4. A zip file will download. To display the contents of the zip file:
          • Google Chrome – will display the download file in the bottom bar in the left corner. Click the arrow and select Open
          • Mozilla Firefox – a window will display. Select Open with… and click OK
          • Safari – the zip file is saved under Downloads

          On Windows computers

          You will need to extract the files out of the zip by clicking Extract all files in the toolbar (instructions may vary depending on what version of Windows you are using).

                 extract all files

          Once this is done you will be asked to select a path to extract to. This is the folder that the files will be saved to. Save the files somewhere that is easy for you to remember and access, as this is where you will be doing your marking. Click Browse… to select a folder.

                 extract files - path

          By leaving Show extracted files when complete ticked a window will open containing the files you extracted, ready for use.

          On Mac computers

          Go to Downloads and double-click on the zip file. The file will automatically be decompressed by Archive Utility into the same folder the zip file is in.

          Tip – once you have extracted (saved) the contents of the zip, ensure you mark student work in the selected folder. This will make it easier for you to zip up the files once you have finished marking.

           


          Download feedback files 

          If you include a feedback file (eg marking guide, rubric) when you create the assignment, FLO will generate a file for every student (by including their FAN at the front of the file name). The download process is the same as for submissions (above) except that you choose Download feedback files in a zip from the Grading action menu:

          Download feedback files in a zip

           


          Download the grading worksheet

          1. Open the assignment

          2. Scroll down and click the View all submissions button
            View all submissions button  

          3. Select Download grading worksheet from the Grading action menu (at the top of the screen)
            Download grading worksheet

          4. To open the grading worksheet:

          • Google Chrome – will display the download file in the bottom bar in the left corner. Click the arrow and select Open
          • Mozilla Firefox – a window will display. Select Open with… and click OK
          • Safari – go to Downloads and double click on the csv file

          1. The grading worksheet is not a zip file and therefore you will not need to extract anything. Save the grading worksheet in a location you will be able to remember

          Note: If you are saving files anywhere outside of the University network (eg USB drive, Dropbox, Google Drive), please make sure you take regular backups of your work.



          Next step

          Once you have finished marking, you will need to upload the marked files and grading worksheet.