Saturday, 25 June 2022, 7:25 AM
Site: Flinders Learning Online
Topic: FLO Staff Support (FLO_Staff_Support)
Glossary: How-to glossary
COLLABORATE

Collaborate - allow students to record video

1. Plan  |   2. Build   |  3. Test   |  4. Administer  |  5. Review  ||   Support  

Collaborate iconThis entry relates to both video creation and Collaborate.

While students can record and upload videos in Kaltura using the Desktop Recorder, there may be circumstances where Collaborate may be more suitable (e.g. group recordings, recordings for an entire class).

Warning! Recordings will be available to all students in the topic.

  • If recordings need to be private, students will need to use another method.
  • If you want to have a confidential discussion you can use a sandpit.

To set up a collaborate session where students can record themselves:

  1. Create a session called ‘Record a video in Collaborate’

    create session button

  2. In event details, select No end (open session)

    The no end box appears under the end date

  3. Click on the Session settings tab.Change the default attendee role to Moderator, and tick the Allow recording downloads box.

    The default attendee role and download options are the first two options in the Session settings tab

  4. Click on the Create button to create your session or click on Save changes to an existing session.


Information to give to students

Send them the following information so they know what to do:

  1. At a mutually convenient time for the whole group, enter the Collaborate session called 'Record a video in Collaborate'
  2. Check your microphone and camera as prompted
  3. To record your session, open the Session menu in the top left corner (the black button with the three lines). You don't have to start recording immediately - you can take a few moments to get organised.
    The start recording link is the first item in the session menu

  4. If you are sharing a file or your screen, use the purple icon in the bottom right corner to the screen. Click on the Share button (highlighted in red below), then choose share file or share application.

     - Share file is best for PowerPoint.
     - Share application is best when you need to show a website or some other software application (e.g. excel)

    The share button is highlighted with a red border.

    For more information, view the guide to sharing in Collaborate.
     
  5. To finish recording, open the Session menu again and select Stop Recording
  6. Let the topic coordinator know that your recording is done and when you did it, so they can rename it for you

Collaborate - building guide

Collaborate is a live, collaborative space that provides the ability to chat, screen-share, share audio and video, poll students, collaborate using a virtual whiteboard or group participants into small 'break-out' spaces. Using the Collaborate activity in a topic ideally consists of the following 5 stages.

1. Plan  |  2. Build  |  3. Test  |  4. Administer  |  5. Review  ||  Support 

Collaborate icon

Collaborate is the official web conferencing tool for learning and teaching at Flinders University.

Disabled features

To help increase the stability of the system and increase performance, the following features are temporarily disabled by the vendor:

  • Timer (a countdown timer)
  • Chat typing indicator (a visual indicator that someone is typing. Chat is otherwise functional.)
  • The number of videos showing at any one time in some browsers has been reduced from 4 to 2

 


Add Collaborate to your FLO topic

Blackboard Collaborate uses modern browser technologies and, for the best experience, please use Google Chrome. Before using Collaborate, please ensure your Google Chrome is up-to-date. Scheduling sessions and Moderator (teacher) access is facilitated through an integration in FLO. Generally, students will also access Collaborate through a FLO topic, but public URLs can also be generated if required (e.g. the Collaborate session will involve users external to Flinders University).

By default, a Collaborate link will be placed in your FLO site and hidden from students (until you unhide the link). However, a link can be added manually. To utilise Collaborate in your topic, complete the following steps:

  1. Turn editing on in your topic

  2. Select 'Add an activity or resource'

  3. Select the Collaborate activity
      Add a collaborate activity

  4. Add a title to the Activity name field

  5. Click on Show more...

  6. In the Activity description paste in this following sentence 

    Collaborate is an online live collaboration space, including chat, audio, video, images, files, and screen-sharing. By entering Collaborate sessions you consent to being recorded. Please check your settings prior to your session.

  7. Tick the box Display description on topic page

  8. Select Save and display

The Collaborate landing page for your topic will be displayed.

Note: Please contact your eLearning Support team if you require assistance adding Collaborate to your topic.

By default, the only room available is the 'Course room' - the course room is a room that is perpetually open and does not have a set start or end time. This is useful for ad-hoc appointments or testing your device for use with Collaborate (e.g. browser version, webcam and microphone).

We recommend leaving the Course room enabled, but this can be disabled if desired by selecting the menu icon for the Course room and choosing 'Lock course room':

Lock course room

See the Collaborate support materials for more information.

This is a quick guide to Collaborate with a brief but comprehensive listing of how to set up/manage a Collaborate session. It is recommended these be used when running sessions, feel free to make the participant guide URL available to your students via a link in your FLO topic https://staff.flinders.edu.au/content/dam/staff/documents/collaborate/collaborate-participant-visual-guide.pdf

 


Create sessions for teaching

By default, Collaborate provides a 'Course room' which is always open for impromptu sessions. If you'd like to schedule one (or more repeating sessions) with a start and an end date, you'll need to create sessions within the Collaborate interface.

create session

To add sessions in Collaborate, access the Collaborate activity created in the step above and refer to the detailed information on creating and editing sessions. When creating repeat sessions, you can select show occurrences to view all occurrences of the session.

Note: Collaborate is currently testing an experimental feature called Amazon Chime. Amazon Chime is not supported for teaching at this time, and we do not recommend that you use it for teaching.

List of created sessions

The default settings for a Collaborate session are as follows:

  • Early access available 15 minutes before session
  • Recorded sessions are not permitted to be downloaded
  • The default role for students is 'Participant'
  • Participants can share:
    • Audio
    • Video / webcam
    • Post chat messages
    • Draw on the whiteboard
    • Attendees can join the session using a telephone and pin number

For more on session settings, please review the support materials.

Collaborate - conduct a secure session with someone

Collaborate is a live, collaborative space that provides the ability to chat, screen-share, share audio and video, poll students, collaborate using a virtual whiteboard or group participants into small 'break-out' spaces. Using the Collaborate activity in a topic ideally consists of the following 5 stages.

1. Plan  |  2. Build  |  3. Test  |  4. Administer  |  5. Review  ||  Support 

Collaborate icon  You're able to run secure sessions outside of the Collaborate instance within your teaching topic.

Disabled features

To help increase the stability of the system and increase performance, the following features are temporarily disabled by the vendor:

  • Timer (a countdown timer)
  • Chat typing indicator (a visual indicator that someone is typing. Chat is otherwise functional.)
  • The number of videos showing at any one time in some browsers has been reduced from 4 to 2

At times you may have a need to run a Collaborate session and be confident no-one else can just “wander in”. Examples could be:

  • Confidential discussions concerning assessments or access plans with a student
  • Assessing a student’s viva voce
  • Confidential meetings between staff members

Creating a Collaborate session within a teaching topic means anyone enrolled in the topic can see the link and access the session, so be aware the session is not private. If you need to create a private session we recommend using an instance of Collaborate within your own sandpit. If you do not have a sandpit you can request one by submitting a Service One request to Education Services > FLO - general query.



Step 1 - Open your sandpit

  • Open your FLO sandpit and add Collaborate if it’s not already there. If you do not have a sandpit, you can request one from your eLearning support team.
  • If you are conducting private meetings we recommend keeping Collaborate hidden within your sandpit, especially if you have given other people access to your site. This will ensure they cannot see the meeting sessions and enter the room.
  • It is not usually possible to keep Collaborate hidden within your topic site, hence why we recommend using a sandpit for this functionality.

Step 2 - Create your session

  • Create a session for your meeting.
  • Ensure you have ticked Guest access under the 'Event details' heading
    guest access

  • Click on the Create button to save the session.

 

Step 3 - Copy the guest link

  • Once the session has been set up, click on the three dots to the right of the session listing (see below) and chose copy guest link from the sub-menu.

    session already created

Step 4 - Invite the participant

  • You can email the guest link to the participant so they’re able to join the session taking place within your sandpit.
    OR
  • Within your topic, you can add a URL and restrict access to the intended student. Ensure you give the session a meaningful name and paste in the correct guest link. Don't put this URL into your sandpit as your students won't have access, it must be placed in your topic FLO site.

    Invite the participant


Step 5 - Restrict the session

  • Restrict the session to the students’ ID number (student ID) so they’re the only person who can follow the link and gain access to the session.
  • NOTE: if the meeting is confidential you must also close the eye to the left of the student ID details, so the link isn’t visible in your FLO site.
  • It would also be good practice to consider the name of the session to ensure confidential information is kept private.

restrict access

Collaborate - hybrid classes

Collaborate is a live, collaborative space that provides the ability to chat, screen-share, share audio and video, poll students, collaborate using a virtual whiteboard or group participants into small 'breakout' spaces. It is also compatible with a growing number of classrooms.

1. Plan  |  2. Build  |  3. Test  |  4. Administer  |  5. Review  ||  Support 

Collaborate icon

This entry relates to the Collaborate tool.


Good practice guides and tip sheets

Good practice guides and tip sheets have been developed to support quality in both curriculum design and teaching practice. Good practice guides provide a pedagogical overview and tip sheets provide you with practical strategies and ideas for implementation. Links to Collaborate-related resources are provided below. 

Running hybrid classes | Teaching offshore students online | Engaging students in a synchronous session | Using online teaching tools to optimise face-to-face time

Disabled features

To help increase the stability of the system and increase performance, the following features are temporarily disabled by the vendor:

  • Timer (a countdown timer)
  • Chat typing indicator (a visual indicator that someone is typing. Chat is otherwise functional.)
  • The number of videos showing at any one time in some browsers has been reduced from 4 to 2

 


1. Plan

Finding a compatible classroom

Not all classrooms are set up for hybrid teaching. Check your topic’s timetable against the list of compatible classrooms. If your room is not compatible, lodge a Service One request to change your classroom. If you cannot get a compatible room, contact your local eLearning team to borrow a group chat kit.  The kits are ideal for small group sessions, have a 30m wireless range and are best placed in the middle of the room.



2. Build

Create a session so that online students can attend. Notify students how to access the online session.

Keep the design of your lesson in mind: What are you trying to achieve with students during their class? Your college’s Academic Developer and Learning Designer may be able to provide some guidance.

Content preparation

You may need to put resources and activities online that you would normally deliver in class, so both your online and face-to-face students can access them.



3. Test

Provide a time before the first class where students can test their technology setup.

Some students may need to purchase a headset or webcam to be able to fully engage in a hybrid class raising equity issues; to assist Adelaide-based students the library is equipped with spaces where students can access Collaborate using a computer with the necessary equipment.    



4. Administer

The Collaborate - administration guide provides a view of the key features you may use while using Collaborate.

The following resources may help you achieve the most from using Collaborate:

When a class starts, encourage some students in the classroom to log into Collaborate with their cameras on and microphones off, to help the sense of inclusion for remote students. The camera can be directed at a wider room, and does not have to be recording a particular student.

Tips for after a session:   



5. Review


  Training and support

  Troubleshooting

Training

Disabled features

To help increase the stability of the system and increase performance, the following features are temporarily disabled by the vendor:

  • Timer (a countdown timer)
  • Chat typing indicator (a visual indicator that someone is typing. Chat is otherwise functional.)
  • The number of videos showing at any one time in some browsers has been reduced from 4 to 2)

Collaborate - main entry

Collaborate is a live, collaborative space that provides the ability to chat, screen-share, share audio and video, poll students, collaborate using a virtual whiteboard or group participants into small 'breakout' spaces. It is also compatible with a growing number of classrooms. Using the Collaborate activity in a topic ideally consists of the following 5 stages.

1. Plan  |  2. Build  |  3. Test  |  4. Administer  |  5. Review  ||  Support 

Collaborate icon

This entry relates to the Collaborate tool.


Good practice guides and tip sheets

Good practice guides and tip sheets have been developed to support quality in both curriculum design and teaching practice. Good practice guides provide a pedagogical overview and tip sheets provide you with practical strategies and ideas for implementation. Links to Collaborate-related resources are provided below. 

Using online teaching tools to optimise face-to-face timeCommunication, interaction and collaboration tools in FLO | Considerations associated with planning the creation of videos for teaching | Engaging students in a synchronous session | Facilitating Student-Teacher interaction in FLO | Running hybrid classes | Authentic and Active Learning | Online topic orientation

Disabled features

To help increase the stability of the system and increase performance, the following features are temporarily disabled by the vendor:

  • Timer (a countdown timer)
  • Chat typing indicator (a visual indicator that someone is typing. Chat is otherwise functional.)
  • The number of videos showing at any one time in some browsers has been reduced from 4 to 2

Collaborate is the official web conferencing tool for learning and teaching at Flinders University.

     


    1. Plan

    The following provides information on best practice and use cases for Collaborate, along with guidance on adding and creating Collaborate sessions within your FLO topic.

    In the Collaborate planning guide, explore the key topics associated with planning to use Collaborate, such as:

    You may also want to check out our guide to using Collaborate in hybrid classes.



    2. Build

    You have planned your use of the Collaborate virtual classroom. Now add the Collaborate shortcut to FLO (if it's not already there) and create your sessions.

    1. Add Collaborate to your FLO topic
    2. Create sessions for teaching
    3. Conduct a secure session with someone
    4. Allow students to record video inside Collaborate



    3. Test

    When using a tool like Collaborate for the first time, it is a good idea to give yourself and your students the opportunity to test they can enter the room. This will help reduce unnecessary technical issues before scheduling important sessions.



    4. Administer

    There are several key aspects associated with the management of sessions.

    An introductory PowerPoint slide for Collaborate (available here) can be placed as a starting slide to help students get started and troubleshoot common technical issues.


      5. Review

      It is important that you evaluate your use of Collaborate at the conclusion of each session. This will help you to improve your use of the tool and therefore enhance learning and teaching.

      If you wish to collaborate as a teaching team (ie with other staff) you could use Teams – an online video and audio-enabled meeting place that allows you to meet with anyone, anywhere, in real-time using a web browser on your computer or mobile device, including iPad, iPhone or Android.



        Training and support

        Troubleshooting

      Training

      Flinders offers both Face-to-Face training, online training and has a recording of our training for Collaborate:

      Support

      Disabled features

      To help increase the stability of the system and increase performance, the following features are temporarily disabled by the vendor:

      • Timer (a countdown timer)
      • Chat typing indicator (a visual indicator that someone is typing. Chat is otherwise functional.)
      • The number of videos showing at any one time in some browsers has been reduced from 4 to 2

      Collaborate - planning guide

      Collaborate is a live, collaborative space that provides the ability to chat, screen-share, share audio and video, poll students, collaborate using a virtual whiteboard or group participants into small 'break-out' spaces. Using the Collaborate activity in a topic ideally consists of the following 5 stages.

      1. Plan  |  2. Build  |  3. Test  |  4. Administer  |  5. Review  ||  Support 

      Collaborate icon

      Collaborate is the official web conferencing tool for learning and teaching at Flinders University. Below is a summary of considerations when planning to use Collaborate in your teaching:

      Good practice guides and tip sheets

      Good practice guides and tip sheets have been developed to support quality in both curriculum design and teaching practice. Good practice guides provide a pedagogical overview and tip sheets provide you with practical strategies and ideas for implementation. Links to Collaborate-related resources are provided below. 

      Accessibility and inclusivity in FLO | Accessibility and Inclusivity in the Classroom | Using online teaching tools to optimise face-to-face time

      Disabled features

      To help increase the stability of the system and increase performance, the following features are temporarily disabled by the vendor:

      • Timer (a countdown timer)
      • Chat typing indicator (a visual indicator that someone is typing. Chat is otherwise functional.)
      • The number of videos showing at any one time in some browsers has been reduced from 4 to 2

       


      What do you want to achieve with Collaborate?

      Collaborate can be used for a range of different purposes: One-to-one, one-to-many and, many-to-many.

      • One to one
        • Discussion/consultation between one academic and one student
          This format usually replaces a face-to-face consultation/meeting due to distance as a barrier for staff or student. May be useful for discussing topics virtually face-to-face for remote students, including supervised research students, where a document needs to be shared on the screen (in comparison to a phone only discussion which does not require a visual sharing). Not traditionally recorded, but individual video camera advisable.

        • Presentation by an individual student for assessment purpose to one other (teacher)
          This format will replace the face-to-face aural/visual presentation due to distance as a barrier. Individual student presents to an assessor (teacher). Not traditionally recorded, but individual video camera advisable.

      • One to many
        • Group discussion between students and teacher
          This format is useful for discussing assessment requirements prior to submission, where distance or time is a barrier. Students are provided with the opportunity to ask questions of their teacher and/or peers to help clarify any confusing information associated with the assessment task. Aural discussions are more useful at clarifying points than written email or forum posts, as ideas can be expressed differently. The session can be recorded to provide the information for non-attendees. Individual (presenter) video camera advisable.

        • Tutorials and lecture-style sessions
          This format sees one presenter/teacher presenting to multiple participants, where discussion or quizzing interaction is encouraged. The session can be recorded to provide the information for non-attendees or as revision for attendees. If no interaction is encouraged for this session, then the presentation may be best recorded using video creation tools like Camtasia or the Kaltura desktop recorder, both freely available at Flinders University. Individual (presenter) video camera advisable.

        • Presentation by a student for assessment or activity to a group of students

          This format is used in classrooms, where off-site students present to an on-campus class. View the room booking list and search for 'web conferencing' to find compatible rooms.

        • Student/other is absent from a physical classroom but can participate remotely
          You can conduct Collaborate sessions in enabled rooms on campus. This means that you can bring off-campus participants (students, guest lecturers) into the physical classroom, and have off-campus participants attend your classes synchronously. 

      • Many to many
        • Group discussion between students
          This format opens communication equally between all participants in a session. Common Uses for this approach is for student peer discussion over a shared task or assessment where location is a barrier. Other uses for this approach is to discuss topics from tutorial tasks. Breaking up large groups of students into small groups for facilitating the discussion is appropriate in this format. Individual video camera and recording of the session not advisable.

        • Presentation by a group of students for assessment or other task to another group of students
          This format will replace the face-to-face aural/visual presentation due to distance as a barrier. Students present to a small group of students and an assessor (teacher). The session can be recorded to provide information for non-attendees. Individual video camera not advisable (especially as break-out rooms are not recorded).

          Collaborate can also be used in some classrooms, meaning that off-site students could present to an on-campus class or vice versa. To find compatible classrooms, view the room booking list and search for 'web conferencing'.

        • Collaborative task between students
          This format includes students sharing documents and screens to support their collaboration, such as preparing for a presentation or other activity. Individual video camera and recording of the session not advisable.


      What does Collaborate look like?

      Collaborate provides Moderators (teachers in a session) and Participants (students in a session) with a simple, clean and user-friendly interface. The following video provides a quick introduction to the Collaborate interface:

      For more information on the Collaborate interface, please see the Collaborate support material for Session Interface Update



      Things to consider when planning your session


      Moderating large numbers or rich student collaboration can quickly become difficult in an online classroom. When planning your sessions, consider the interaction that you are wanting your students to partake in. The more complex the interactions, the more likely you'll need to support your students to complete the task.

      In some circumstances (eg large sessions, break-out rooms etc.) it may be best to have multiple Moderators present to facilitate the online session. Multiple Moderators allow a presenter to concentrate on presenting while other moderators monitor the chat, provide basic technical support to students etc.


      Time Zones

      The times in Collaborate are converted and displayed according to the timezones set on the student's device. For example, if you are in Adelaide and create a session that starts at 3 pm, a student in Sydney or Melbourne will see that it starts at 3:30 pm.


      Consider the student cohort

      Before holding a formal or required session, it is worth offering one or two informal Collaborate sessions to ensure your students are familiar with the technology and are able to test their microphone and webcam (if this is required).

      It is also important to consider students with limited bandwidth (eg students located in remote locations, students using mobile devices) as some features such as screen sharing or multiple webcams require a large amount of bandwidth to stream.

      Collaborate provides many features to assist in managing differing bandwidths. You can easily determine a student's relative ability to exchange audio, video, or application sharing during a session with the new session user connectivity indicators. It will also dynamically adjust what is being displayed within the session for each participant based on their current connection. For more information on how this works, access the Network Connect support material.


      Collaborate recordings for future use

      Collaborate recordings will be retained for the life of the FLO topic or 1 year. If you wish to reuse a recording from one topic availability to another, you'll need to download the recording and upload it to your Media Vault.

      If the recording is not capturing any collaboration or participation, it may be worth considering desktop video recording tools such as Camtasia or the Kaltura desktop recorder.


      Allowing students to moderate their own sessions

      The course room can be used by students and this does not require a staff member to be present - students can access the Course Room at any time from any device. By default, a Participants role allows them to share their audio and video. To find out more about roles in Collaborate, access the 'What can the different roles do' support materials.

      If you'd like your students to have all of the permissions that a Moderator has, your Course Room can be altered to give any person that enters Moderator (or Presenter) permissions. This will provide students with the collaborative tools outlined in the 'Collaborative sharing tools' section.

      Moderator for student

       

      Using Collaborate for assessment

      Please contact your College eLearning team to talk through considerations around using Collaborate for assessment purposes.


      Accessibility

      Collaborate has been built with enhanced accessibility features including support for JAWS, VoiceOver, Live Closed Captioning, Keyboard Navigation and Screen readers. For more information on these features, see the following information:



      Collaborative and sharing tools

      Collaborate provides several tools to share content and engage with session participants. These tools are as follows:

      • Breakout groups: Split participants within the session into small groups for collaboration
      • Chat: Text chat with all participants (chat also allows a restricted chat between Moderators)
      • Polling: Poll Participants with simple polls such as True / False or using 1 - 4 options that you define
      • Document or screen sharing: Either share your screen or upload a document to present to all participants

        Supported file types for uploaded documents include: .ppt, .pptx, .pdf and supported image files include: .gif, .jpeg, .png. It is recommended that you upload PowerPoint / PDF files rather than share your screen as this requires less bandwidth for all participants and increases the accessibility of the content

      The following video provides an overview of these sharing tools:

       



      Software, equipment, teaching spaces and telephone dialling

      Software

      Collaborate supports the two most recent releases of Chrome, Firefox, Edge and Safari. Flinders recommends using Google Chrome to utilise the application sharing features. You do not need to install any additional software or plugins to use Collaborate.

      For staff computers managed by Flinders University, we recommend checking the Software Centre to ensure you have the most recent version of Google Chrome installed. Instructions on using the Software Centre.

      More information on system requirements.


      Equipment

      When enabling your microphone or webcam in Collaborate, you'll need to provide Google Chrome permission to activate and transmit your webcam. Please refer to the Collaborate support materials when using Google Chrome.

      Video/webcam: When using Google Chrome, Collaborate is able to transmit up to five videos and audio (webcam and microphone) streams. Although more microphones and webcams can be enabled, Collaborate prioritises the top five based on who is currently speaking. There may be a slight delay while Collaborate re-enables a microphone/webcam for a participant that Collaborate has previously muted.

      Audio: It is recommended that any user who is speaking uses a headset with a microphone or uses the teleconference number to reduce the occurrence of background noise and feedback. Although Collaborate has echo cancellation built-in, using a headset will give the best experience. If a student does not have a headset, we advise requesting the student to use the teleconference number.

      Video chat kits are available for loan to academic staff for use in desktop video conferencing, virtual classroom sessions (eg Collaborate) or recording short videos for FLO. Each eLearning support team has:

      • 2 webchat kits (consisting of a webcam and USB headset)
      • 1 web group chat kit (consisting of a webcam and a Bluetooth microphone/speaker).
      An introductory PowerPoint slide for Collaborate (available here) can be placed as a starting slide to help students get started and troubleshoot common technical issues.

      Please contact your local eLearning support team for further details and booking.


      Teaching spaces and meeting rooms

      Flinders University has a number of teaching spaces and meeting rooms suitable for Collaborate. Please refer to the room booking list to see rooms that support web conferencing (including classrooms).

      IDS have produced a user guide for using Collaborate in a classroom.


      Telephone dialling / Teleconference number

      Collaborate allows users (moderators and participants) to listen/talk into a session by dialling into a telephone number and enter the session PIN (please note: each pin is unique to a session and an individual user in that session) - commonly referred to as teleconferencing. This is useful if a participant does not have the correct equipment, or is struggling to enable their microphone. Each participant receives a unique PIN for each session they enter (PIN is available within the Session Menu) and can dial into a local or international number to participate within the session. For help using this functionality click here.

      The local number for Adelaide is +61 8 7100 1859.



      Support for mobile browsers

      Collaborate works on mobile phones for participants and presenters, but some of the presentation features are limited.


      What mobile browsers does Collaborate work on?

      Collaborate supports the browsers on recent versions of iOS and Android. The Collaborate website has further details on what these are.

      Older mobile phones may work, but there is no guarantee that all features will work correctly.


      Features available on mobile browsers
      • Audio, video and chat are available
      • Breakout rooms and polling are available
      • Staus and feedback (e.g. raising hands) is available

      Screen sharing

      • You cannot initiate screen sharing on a mobile browser
      • Students on mobile browsers can view screen sharing started by other people

      File sharing

      • Files stored on your phone can be shared
      • Files previously uploaded to the room can be shared
      • On an iPhone, files stored in other third-party apps (e.g. OneDrive) are not accessible
      • On Android, files stored in other third-party apps (e.g. OneDrive) can be accessed

      Collaborate - session reports

      Collaborate is a live, collaborative space that provides the ability to chat, screen-share, share audio and video, poll students, collaborate using a virtual whiteboard or group participants into small 'break-out' spaces. Using the Collaborate activity in a topic ideally consists of the following 5 stages.

      1. Plan  |  2. Build  |  3. Test  |  4. Administer  |  5. Review  ||  Support 
      Disabled features

      To help increase the stability of the system and increase performance, the following features are temporarily disabled by the vendor:

      • Timer (a countdown timer)
      • Chat typing indicator (a visual indicator that someone is typing. Chat is otherwise functional.)
      • The number of videos showing at any one time in some browsers has been reduced from 4 to 2

      Collaborate icon

      After a Collaborate session, you can view and download an attendance report, and download the results of any polling undertaken. These reports will be available approximately 5 minutes after the last person has left the session.



      How to view session reports

      You can view reports of completed sessions on the Collaborate Sessions page. 

      1. Use the Filter by drop-down menu to help you locate the completed session
      2. When you've found the session you want to see a report on, select the Session Options menu
      3. Select View reports

      sessions page




      Session attendance report

      The Session attendance report provides an overview of when attendees joined and left the session. It also gives you an idea of how long attendees were present in the session on average. 

      See the steps above on how to view session reports and then click the View report link under Attendance.
      view report


      Now that you know when students joined and left the session, you can check in with them to see if they had any technical issues or need a quick review of what was presented and discussed.session report


      Report particulars
      Name The name of each unique attendee
      Role Moderator = Teaching team member
      Participant = Student
      More on roles and permissions
      Attendee Type

      Integration indicates that an attendee entered the session via the Collaborate tool in FLO

      Guest indicates that an attendee entered the session via a link provided to them (e.g. someone from outside your topic)
      First join Date and time when the attendee first joined the session
      Last leave Date and time when the attendee last left the session
      Total time The total time the attendee was in the session
      Joins

      The number of times the attendee joined and/or reconnected to the session

      If an attendee joined more than once, click the View join details iconView join details icon on the right for all join/leave details



      Download poll results

      If you've used the Polling feature in a Collaborate session, you can download the poll results. 

      See the steps above on how to view session reports then click the download icon under Polls. 

      Poll download

      The report includes the poll question/s, how each attendee responded and the date/time of their response.


      Collaborate - testing guide

      Collaborate is a live, collaborative space that provides the ability to chat, screen-share, share audio and video, poll students, collaborate using a virtual whiteboard or group participants into small 'break-out' spaces. Using the Collaborate activity in a topic ideally consists of the following 5 stages.

      1. Plan  |  2. Build  |  3. Test  |  4. Administer  |  5. Review  ||  Support 
      Disabled features

      To help increase the stability of the system and increase performance, the following features are temporarily disabled by the vendor:

      • Timer (a countdown timer)
      • Chat typing indicator (a visual indicator that someone is typing. Chat is otherwise functional.)
      • The number of videos showing at any one time in some browsers has been reduced from 4 to 2

      Collaborate icon

      To ensure you don't disrupt your Collaborate teaching sessions with troubleshooting issues, it's advisable to run test sessions with students at key times. To do this you can either create a session and informally invite your students to visit during a scheduled time, or you can encourage your students to visit you using the 'Course Room'.



      Orientation / troubleshooting session for your students

      • Orientation session
        This should be arranged for the beginning of the semester and is a great way for everyone to come together and test their equipment in an informal session. This is then stress free as there's time to fix any technical issues students may be experiencing.

      • Using Collaborate to bring online students or guest speakers into a physical classroom
        This can be arranged with the group of students who are coming in remotely. The eLearning team can also help you test the classroom to ensure everything works as expected.

      • Using Collaborate at home
        This may not necessarily have students involved in the test, but you can arrange a call either with a colleague or a member of the eLearning team to test if your equipment works before your session.

      • Regular Collaborate sessions
        If you're running regular sessions within your topic, we advise joining the room a little early and encouraging your students to do the same so there is time to sort out any issues that may arise before the session is scheduled to begin.

      • FLO student support
        The FLO Student Helpdesk is available to support students when they require assistance with Collaborate.



      Course room (unlocked room)

      By default, Collaborate provides a 'Course Room' which is always open for impromptu sessions. It is also a good place to test access to a room for future scheduled sessions.

      The Course Room is open at all times and gives students the opportunity to meet with you or with each other at any time without the need to schedule sessions. It also enables users (you and your students) to check that they can enter the room and use some features, like video, audio and chat.

      course room unlocked

      If you'd like to schedule one (or more repeating sessions) with a start and an end date, you'll need to create sessions within the Collaborate interface.

      DATABASE

      Database - build a database activity (step 2)

      1. Plan  |   2. Build   |  3. Test   | 4. Administer   |  5. Review   ||  Support  

      database iconThis entry relates to the Database activity.

      Once you have created the database activity 'shell', you need to build it (using fields) and create templates. To build the database you can:


      Choose a predefined set of fields (preset)

        Once you have created the database, you need to define the field types for the information you wish to collect. You can use a database preset (or predefined set up fields). Optionally, you can then edit the database templates to alter the way in which the database displays entries.

        1. Click the Presets tab
          Presets tab 

        2. On the Presets page, scroll down to the Use a preset section
          Use a present

        3. Select the preset (eg Image gallery) and click Choose. Note that a field for tags will be automatically added, but will not be visible on this page

        4. On the Field mappings page, select the Overwrite current settings check box and click Continue  you will be invited to Add entries
          Field mappings

        5. If you want to edit the preset fields, go to the Fields tab. Click on the cog wheel next to the field under the Action menu. You can also Create a new field in this screen (see instructions below)
          Edit preset fields


        Create your own fields

        You will have thought about the following questions in the database activity planning phase:

        • What fields/questions do I want my students to answer?
        • What format will my students answer in? Text? Uploading images or documents? Links?
        • What fields are required/optional?
        Steps

        1. Click the Fields tab to create a new field section
          Fields tab 

        2. Choose the field type you want to create (Text area, Radio button, URL etc) from the drop-down list. For a description of what the different field types mean (eg Text area vs Text input), see Moodle Docs: Building Database
          Create a new field

        3. Enter the Field name and Field description (note: the Field description is not the instructions to the user, it is for administrator viewing only). If you need to ensure one or several particular fields are always completed, then tick the Required field box. Click Add.
          Field name and description 

        4. Once you have finished adding your fields they will appear listed in the Fields tab
           
        5. Next, you may want to edit the database templates to make the database entries display the way you want them. See Create templates for your database (step 3)


        Customise the database search

        Once you and your students have populated the database beyond a certain size, you'll want it to be (more) searchable. The database is searchable by default, but you can customise the search to suit the database.

        1. On the View list or Search page, deselect the Advanced search check box and click Save settings
          Search

        2. Do one of the following:

          1. Use the fields that now display below the list to conduct a simple search. To search, enter a Search term and either click Save settings or press Enter
            OR
          2. Select the Templates tab, then on the Templates page select the Advanced search template tab, and define the template to suit your and your students' needs

        Database - create a database activity (step 1)

        1. Plan  |   2. Build   |  3. Test   | 4. Administer  |  5. Review   ||  Support  

        database iconThis entry relates to the Database activity.

        First you have to create the activity (steps below). This provides the 'shell' for the activity. Then you will need to build the database (fields and searchability) (step 2) and create templates to aid usability (step 3).

        When setting up the conditions for adding entries, you can decide whether entries need to be approved, and whether/who to give ratings to entries (if ratings are used for marking). 


        Steps

        1. Turn editing on using the green button – this button is available top left of screen on the topic homepage
           Turn editing on
        2. Go to the module where you would like the database to appear
        3. Click the Add an activity or resource link at the bottom of the module
          Add an activity or resource

        4. Select Database from Activities tab
          database icon
           
        5. In the General section enter a Name for the database and some text in the Description field explaining how the database will be used
          general section

        6. Under Entries, select: 
          o whether the topic coordinator/teacher's approval is required before the entry will display to other students in the database
          o whether it is allowed to edit the approved entries (this is disabled if no approval is required)
          o whether you will allow comments on entries
          o the number of entries required for completion per student for the activity to be considered complete
          o the number of entries required before viewing other students’ entries
          o the maximum number of entries any student can contribute to the database
          database entries screen

        7. If necessary, under Availability, enable the date fields and define the periods for which the database will be available for contributions, and in read-only form (Read only from) if applicable
          Timeline block: The 'Available to' date will show to students in the Timeline block.

          database availability

        8. Set up the Ratings system if you want students to rate entries. You must save the activity before the Roles with permission to rate will display – ask your eLearning support team to add students (permissions). You can:
          o tell FLO how to decide on a final rating (Aggregate type)
          o indicate whether to apply a Scale to the ratings
          o Restrict ratings to items with dates in the given date range

          database ratings

        9. You can set up activity completion for your database based on the below conditions 

           
        10. Complete the remainder of the page and click Save and display

        Database - customise the templates (step 3)

        1. Plan  |   2. Build   |  3. Test   | 4. Administer  |  5. Review   ||  Support  

        database iconThis entry relates to the Database activity.

        Templates for the database activity allow you to control the visual layout of information when listing, viewing or editing database entries. A basic level of HTML knowledge may be necessary to edit database templates. If you need help, contact your local eLearning support team

        Before you create a template, you first need to Create a database activity (step 1) and Build a database activity (step 2).

        There are six template types, but the most important ones (for a good user experience) are the Add templateSingle template and List template. You will need to make changes to all three templates. The instructions below are for basic customisations only. For more sophisticated customisations, contact your local eLearning support team

        1. View template options 

        Then create your templates in the following (logical) order:

        1. Add template (how the Add entry looks)
        2. Single template (how a single entry looks)
        3. List template (how a list of entries looks)


        View template options

        These instructions tell you how to bold the field names, and make the table that field names and field types sit in more viewable and usable.

        To view the complete list of templates, and access the View list, View single and Add entry types:

        1. Click on the database activity you have set up

        2. In the next screen, click on the Templates tab. You will see the template options. Select the tab you want to create a template (Add template, Single template, List template)
          Templates tab

         


        1. Create an Add template

        The Add template determines what users see when they click on the Add entry prompt (ie how the fields are displayed). In this template, you can provide more information/instruction to users about what they need to enter into a field (eg instead of just having the field title, have a question and/or examples). Example field name: 'Duration' – the question could be 'How long did this task take? (Please enter in hours, rounded to the nearest full hour)'

        These instructions tell you how to bold the field names, and make the table that the field names and field types sit in more viewable and usable.

        1. As per the steps above (View template options), make sure you are in the Add template tab

        2. To bold field names, highlight the field name and click on the B prompt in the HTML toolbar
          Bold field names

        3. To make the table more user friendly, by creating more space between field names (left column) and responses (right column)you will need to go into the HTML code. To do this, click on the HTML icon in the HTML editor 
          HTML mode

        4. You will now see the HTML code view for the template

        5. Add style="width:100%;" cellpadding="5" align="left" [+ space after "left"/before code that follows] after <table ...> (ie <table style="width:100%;" cellpadding="5" align="left" ). This code means the table will use all space available in the screen (width:100%), the distance between table cell and text will be 5 pixels (cellpadding="5"), and text will be aligned left (you could also align "center" (note American spelling) or "right"
          Add HTML code

        6. To provide instructions to the user adding an entry, put your cursor at the beginning of a right-hand row, and click Enter. Fill in the space above with the instruction
          Provide instructions

        7. Scroll to the bottom of the screen and click Save template

        8. To see what your changes look like, click on the Add entry tab
           


        2. Create a Single template

        The Single template determines how one result looks to the user. This is the template where you can add a user tag so that you know who has contributed.

        These instructions tell you how to bold the field names, and make the table that field names and field types sit in more viewable and usable.

        1. As per the steps above (View template options), make sure you are in the Single template tab (under Templates)

        2. Follow steps 2-6 above (under Create an Add template)

        3. Scroll to the bottom of the screen and click Save template 

        4. To see what your changes look like, click on the View single tab (you need to have added an entry to see what this looks like)

        Add a user tag

        If you add a user tag, you will be able to see who has added an entry, which will be useful for adding comments etc. You can update the template with this tag even after the database is open for adding entries (and entries have been added).

        These instructions assume you have already set up this template (see above).

        1. Under Templates, click on the Single template tab

        2. With your mouse, select the row in the Single template text box that you want to add a user row/column after/before
          Select row in table

        3. Click on the Table icon in the HTML toolbar and select Insert row after or Insert row before (or column)
          Insert row

        4. To add the user tag, place your cursor where you want it to go in the template box, then select User (under Other) in the Available tags box. The ##user## tag should automatically appear in the selected location in your template table
          Add user tag

        5. Scroll down and click Save template

        6. To check, click on the View single tab (add an entry to see how this looks if the database is not yet open to students)



        3. Create a List template

        The List template determines how a list of results (entries) looks to the user. You do not need to include every field (eg as for the Add template), particularly when there are lots of fields. The list can just be some key fields (eg Journal name).

        1. As per the steps above (View template options), make sure you are in the List template tab

        2. Follow steps 2-6 above (under Create an Add template)

        3. To delete a field, select the table row, click on the Table icon in the HTML editor and select Delete row
          Delete row

        4. Scroll to the bottom of the screen and click Save template

        5. To see what your changes look like, click on the View list tab (you need to have added at least one entry to see what this looks like)

        Database - main entry

        Using a database activity in your topic is one way to allow students to create content and share it with others. Using the Database activity in a topic ideally consists of 5 stages, in a looped process.

        1. Plan  |  2. Build  |  3. Test  |  4. Administer  |  5. Review  ||  Support 
          Database iconThe database activity allows teachers and students to build up a bank of structured information (a 'collection'). A database activity could be used:

        • as a collaborative collection of web links, books, book reviews, journal references etc
        • to display student-created photos, posters, websites or text for peer comment and review.
        Using a database in your topic is a way to allow students to create content ('entries') and interact with others (collaborate). Students have the opportunity to teach and learn from their peers by making considered decisions about resources that require critical thinking, and supporting their choices through debate (comments). As well as being a resource in the current topic, the content created can become a legacy or resource/exemplar for another (future) topic (ie it can be rolled over).

        The database entries need to be exported/imported separately if you want to use the database in another site (eg the topic's next version) – only the database shell will be copied over. Contact your eLearning support team.

        Good practice guides and tip sheets

        Good practice guides and tip sheets have been developed to support quality in both curriculum design and teaching practice. Good practice guides provide a pedagogical overview and tip sheets provide you with practical strategies and ideas for implementation. Links to database-related resources are provided below. 

        Providing constructive feedback in FLO



          1. Plan

          The success of the database activity is in the planning. Once students begin adding content (entries), it can be tricky to change the fields, so thinking ahead is key. 

          What is the intended purpose of the database activity? 

          • What fields/questions do you want your students to answer? What format – uploading images or documents? Links? What fields are required/optional?
          • How does it link to assessment – is it an assessment item itself, or is it a step towards an assessment item (eg resource supporting assessment, digital literacy skill development)?
          • How interactive do you want the activity to be? Allow comments on entries (moderated/unmoderated)? Students/teachers rate entries? Ratings can be aggregated to form a final grade which is recorded in the Gradebook.

          The structure of the entries is defined by the teacher as a number of fields. The visual layout of information when listing, viewing or editing database entries is  controlled by templates

          When creating a database for the first time, it can be helpful to think about it like an Excel spreadsheet. The teacher creates the columns (fields), and students and/or teachers add rows of content.


          2. Build

          Once you have planned your database fields, you are ready to set up your database.

            1. Create a database activity (settings)
            2. Define database fields (preset, create your own, make your database searchable)
            3. Customise the templates (View list, View single, Add entry)

            3. Test

            The database activity is a highly customisable and very versatile tool, so it's important to test what you've built thoroughly before releasing the activity to students. Ask your local eLearning support team to check your Database for you (especially if this is your first time). It is best to amend mistakes before students add entries.

            • Practice creating an entry – as a form of scaffolding, you could support students by showing what an entry that's added looks like
            • Preview the Single, List, and Add views – is the layout is clear and easy to understand?


            4. Administer

            When setting up your database activity, you can enable a number of optional settings. Some of these settings require administration by a teacher:

            • Approve entries – If enabled, entries require approving by a teacher before they are viewable by everyone
            • Give ratings to entries – if ratings are being used for marking (settings)

            To encourage students to add entries, you could add an initial entry to model good practice, setting a standard and ensuring that instructions are not misunderstood. You could add the first entry in the Test phase). This is equivalent to making the first post in a forum. The fields you set up when you built the database will also prompt students as to what to add to create an entry. Students like examples and will engage more promptly with the tool.

            You can see how many students have contributed on the topic homepage:
            database contributions


            5. Review

            How did your database activity go? Would you set up the activity differently next time round? Talk to colleagues and/or your local eLearning support team to get ideas for improvement.

            If you are happy with the activity and you want to use the content in a future topic version/other topics, you can ask your eLearning support team to roll over or import the database activity. The entries will need to be exported/imported separately. 


              Training and support

              Troubleshooting

            Support

            eLearning support teams

            There are no known issues with this tool, but you may require help to build it.

            DESIGN

            Designing a banner for your FLO site

            Whether you are starting from scratch or working with an existing site, using a banner transforms your site and makes it instantly recognisable.

            1. Plan  |  2. Build  |  3. Test  |  4. Review  || Support

            A banner is designed to give a face to your site and make it recognisable to your students. The banner is visible on top of the site, as well as on the topic 'card' on the My FLO page.



            Image specifications

            The same image file is used for both the topic site banner and the topic card viewed on My FLO, with each displaying different elements of the picture. It should also be noted that these two regions can vary slightly depending on window size, device and whether the navigation menu is open.

            Most landscape orientation photos will be roughly 4x3 aspect ratio (width x height). If a full image like this is uploaded, the central area is displayed as in the example below.

            A yellow border shows the part that will be seen in My FLO. A blue border shows the part that will be seen in the topic.


            To ensure a high quality banner, images should be optimised and cropped to 1920 x 850 pixels (px), the recommended dimensions. The example below shows the image which would be uploaded to FLO.

            A breakwater is on the right of the image. The sun is setting behind the breakwater, and reflecting off the water.


            On My FLO, this banner image would appear like this in topic cards:

            Two topics in My FLO. The first topic has the default banner. The second topic has the picture of the sunset.


            Within the topic, this banner image would appear like this:

            The top of a FLO site, including the banner. It is cropped, matching the blue borders in the first image.


            The FLO topic name and navigation breadcrumbs sit over the left side of the banner. Depending on the image content, it may be useful to flip the image horizontally. In this example, the image has been flipped and the darker less interesting region has the topic title overtop.

            The banner has been flipped so the breakwater (and the shadow cast by the setting sun) is on the left side of the image.



            What if the area of interest in the image is not central?

            If the area of interest is not central in the image, it may still be a suitable image for a banner, as long as it can be cropped to 1920 x 850 px region centred around the area of interest.

            Examples:

            A picture of a coastline, taken from above. The bottom half of the image is greyed out, indicating that it will be removed.

            The cropped version of the previous picture.

            A picture of the Hub and the path heading south (to Anchor Court). The left and bottom side of the image is greyed out.

            The cropped version of the previous image.


            For staff who wish to prepare their own banner image, Snagit is a University-supplied program which can do everyday image editing. Snagit is available through the IDS Support Portal. Home-use licences are also available (request via Service One)

            Banners for teaching sites will be uploaded by college eLearning teams. Send your image via a Service One request. You can either send them a cropped, optimised image or a candidate image that they can prepare for you.

            If you wish to see how your banner looks, try uploading it to your sandpit.

            Note: Images must be royalty/copyright free.

            Suggested sources of free images

            1. Pexels
            2. Unsplash
            3. Pixabay

            FLO interface - WebPET (Web Presence in Every Topic)

            1. Layout  |  2. Customisation  |  3. Topics  |  4. Logout  ||  Support 

            This entry relates to the FLO interface.

            This information has now been replaced by the digital learning guidelines.

            What is 'WebPET'?

            WebPET (Web Presence in Every Topic) aims to provide:

            • a coherent and flexible student-University interface 
            • students with ready access to information which is timely, current and unambiguous 
            • a base for further use of technology to enhance the quality of teaching and learning 
            • minimum expectations of support - 'As a Flinders student I can expect…..'. 
            • efficiencies for academic and support staff 

            And in addition:

            • a more widespread and consistent use of FLO 
            • increased provision of online lecture recordings 
            • increased use of online assignment submission 

            Students are generally happy with using FLO for their studies but have expressed their desire for more consistency across their topics. 

            What does it look like?

            As a minimum, each FLO site has:

            • a topic links block (including links to topic information, library services, the SET system, a marks/grades tool, an email address lookup tool, and a link to staff and student help services) 
            • a general discussion forum 
            • an announcements forum and latest announcements block 
            • a calendar block 


            Expectations of staff

            All staff are required to:

            •  make all handouts available electronically through FLO (including the Statement of Assessment Methods
            •  post all important topic messages through the announcements forum 
            •  provide lecture recordings to students via FLO
            •  allow electronically-produced assignments to be submitted and returned electronically


            What you can expect from the University

            The University will:

            • automatically set up new FLO sites to contain the minimum tools and links
            • automatically generate the required information within sites
            • automatically insert recorded lectures into FLO sites 
            • provide support for the electronic assignment functionality 

            Upload banner to FLO site

            Whether you are starting from scratch or working with an existing site, using a banner transforms your site and makes it instantly recognisable.

            1. Plan  |  2. Build  |  3. Test  |  4. Review  || Support

            A banner is designed to give a face to your site and make it recognisable to your students. The banner is visible on top of the site, as well as on the topic 'card' on the My FLO page.



            1. Plan

            It is advised that you have a process for creating your banner. Decide what elements, colours, image(s) you need and discuss your requirements with your local eLearning team. Either you can design the banner image or we can assist you.

            A FLO banner has certain guidelines:

            • Needs to be 1920px (width) x 850px (height)
            • Banner images are not cropped as much in site card view as in site banner view. Outlier elements can be included in the site card view.
            • Banner images are cropped in site banner view. Keep important elements visible within the center 200px.
            • Do not use text as it can be overlaid by other elements such the site name and code.
            • Check to see if the banner conveys its meaning in both formats; i.e. site summary card view and site banner view.
            • Use your own photos or one that you have permission to use – don’t copy from a website without permission. Free images can be sourced from Pexels, Unsplash, or Pixabay
            Banner guidelines

            For instructions on how to make a banner, view our guide on designing a banner for your FLO site (your local eLearning team can also make a banner for you).



            2. Build

            You will need a sandpit to upload and test the banner on. If you don't already have a sandpit, please contact your local eLearning team.


            Upload the banner to your sandpit

            1. Open your sandpit and, click Topic ManagementTopic Management in the top menu (note: you must be on the home page of your sandpit)

            2. Click on the cog in the top right corner, then click Edit settings
              The cog is in the top right corner. 'Edit settings' is the first item in the menu.

            3. Drag and drop your image to upload
              Topic banner upload
            4. Click Save and display

            5. Check to see if the banner displays properly, both as the site banner as well as the site card image on My FLO page. Tweak the image if certain parts aren't showing or you need something highlighted.



            3. Test

            Ask your colleagues or the eLearning support team to check the set up of your banner. Once you are satisfied with the banner in all formats, please contact your local eLearning team to upload the banner from your sandpit to your topic.



            4. Review

            How does it look? What did students think? These types of questions can help you refine the banner. Please contact your local eLearning team for assistance.


              Training and support

              Troubleshooting

            Support

            eLearning support teams


            DIALOGUE

            Dialogue - main entry

            The dialogue tool in a topic ideally consists of 4 stages, in a looped process.

            1. Plan  |  2. Build  |  3. Test  |  4. Administer  ||  Support 

            Good practice guides and tip sheets

            Good practice guides and tip sheets have been developed to support quality in both curriculum design and teaching practice. Good practice guides provide a pedagogical overview and tip sheets provide you with practical strategies and ideas for implementation. Links to assignment-related resources are provided below. 

            Communication, interaction and collaboration tools in FLO | Facilitating Student-Teacher interaction in FLO 

            Dialogue icoxThe dialogue tool allows you to start one-to-one conversations with your students or allows students to initiate conversations with you or others in the topic. A copy of all messages will be kept within the topic.


            1. Plan your dialogue

            The dialogue tool has some similarities to other communication methods (e.g. email, forums, messages). Dialogue allows for one to one conversations inside the topic, as opposed to forums which are mainly for group discussions and messaging, which is for one on one discussion, but is not recorded in the topic.

            You could use the dialogue tool to:

            • ask a question of some or all students in your topic, and have them reply individually
            • ask students if they have any problems working in their project teams.
            Conversations between a student and a staff member can be seen by all staff with access to the topic. This can be useful for larger topics, but may not be appropriate for topics where a lot of sensitive discussions are expected.


            2. Build

            The dialogue tool can be set up with a few quick steps:

            1. In your topic click Turn editing on
              turn editing on
            2. In the week/module where you want the dialogue to appear, click Add an activity or resource
              add an activity or resource button
            3. Select Dialogue and click add button
            4. Fill in the dialogue Name and Introduction
              type a dialogue name and description
            5. Click Save and display
              save and display button


              3. Test

              The easiest way to see how the dialogue tool works is to try it out with a colleague (or multiple colleagues).


              4. Administer

              You can send a message to a particular person, or send identical copies of a message to everyone in a group.

              1. In the dialogue activity, click Create
                Select 'create'

              2. If sending a message to a single person, start typing the users name in the People box. Select the name of the person from the dropdown list.
                Begin typing the user's name and then select student from the drop-down menu

                If sending a message to multiple people, click on Bulk open rule and select a group to send the message to. If you want to include any users who may join the group in the future, tick Include future members.

                select a group from the drop-down menu

              3. Enter a Subject and type a Message
                type a subject and message

              4. Click the Send button when you are ready. If you are sending a message to a group, each person in the group will get an individual copy of the message.
                click save
              If you are not receiving notifications about new messages, check your notification settings in the preferences menu:
              Preferences menu Notifications link

                Training and support

                Troubleshooting

              Support
              eLearning support team
              There are no known issues with this tool.
              EXTERNAL TOOL

              External tool - main entry

              The external tool activity enables students to interact with learning resources and activities on other web sites using LTI (Learning Tools Interoperability).

              1. Plan  |  2. Build  |  3. Test  ||  Support 
              external tool iconExternal tool activities differ from URL resources in a few ways.

              • External tools are context aware (ie they have access to information about the user who launched the tool, such as institution, topic and name).
              • External tools support reading, updating, and deleting grades associated with the activity instance.
              • External tool configurations create a trust relationship between your site and the tool provider, allowing secure communication between them.

               


              1. Plan

              Decide what external tool you want to use from the University-wide pre-approved list:

              To create an external tool not listed above, please contact your eLearning support team before you sign up for a product. External tool requests are not automatically added. Requests are reviewed and assessed on a case-by-case basis.

               


              2. Build

              You have planned what external tool to use, now follow these steps to set it up in your topic.

                1. Turn editing on using the green button which is available on the topic homepage (top left of screen) 
                  Turn editing on button

                2. Go to the module where you would like the external tool to appear

                3. Click the Add an activity or resource link at the bottom of the module
                  Add an activity or resource link

                4. Select External tool from the Activities tab
                  External tool

                5. Give the tool a name in the Activity name section

                6. Select the tool required  from the Preconfigured tool list
                  Select preconfigured tool

                  Timeline block: Using the 'Expect completed on' date in the Activity completion setting will show a date to students in the Timeline block.

                7. If using Feedback Fruits, you will also need to select that activity using the Select Content button.

                8. Click Save and display

                 


                3. Test

                Check the recently added external tool to make sure it is working as expected.

                 


                Training and support

                Troubleshooting

                Support

                Please contact your eLearning support team

                You may have one of the following issues:

                External tool - Readings

                This entry relates to the list of External tools

                Readings iconThe Readings tool allows you to assemble materials of all types – physical books, ebooks, online or digitised book chapters, scholarly articles, videos, newspaper articles, websites, and more – in a structured, comprehensive resource list. 

                Good practice guides and tip sheets

                Good practice guides and tip sheets have been developed to support quality in both curriculum design and teaching practice. Good practice guides provide a pedagogical overview and tip sheets provide you with practical strategies and ideas for implementation. Links to readings-related resources are provided below. 

                Considerations associated with compiling a reading list | Considerations associated with selecting a textbook




                1. How does Readings work?

                You can put any number of resource types into your readings list including (but not limited to):

                • books and book chapters
                • streaming videos
                • government reports
                • blogs
                • websites
                • lecture slides
                • an image from the Online Collections Catalogue (Flinders University Museum of Art)



                2. Where can I find it?

                Readings is added to every topic. If it has been removed from your topic, please contact your eLearning support team.
                Readings logo



                3. What can I do in Readings?

                • Build your readings list from:
                  • the Library collection
                  • online browsing
                  • databases
                  • your own personal collection
                • Manage and update all your readings lists in one place, throughout the teaching period
                • Structure reading lists to your own teaching practices
                • Monitor student engagement through system analytics – view reports to see what citations students are looking at, see full-text access views, and when students are accessing resources

                The Library will:

                • appropriately source licensed resources and manage copyright compliance
                • automatically add resources from Flinders' licensed subscriptions
                • maintain links and access


                Support

                • View the Readings Workshop FLO site for written instructions
                • Contact the Learning Access Team via the Readings query in Service One (Education Services).

                Statement of Assessment Methods (SAM)

                A piece of paper with a series of ticks on it.The Statement of Assessment Methods (SAM) lists the assessment requirements for each topic. SAMs for each topic are found in that topic's FLO site but are edited in Flex.

                Good practice guides and tip sheets

                Good practice guides and tip sheets have been developed to support quality in both curriculum design and teaching practice. Good practice guides provide a pedagogical overview and tip sheets provide you with practical strategies and ideas for implementation. Links to assessment-related resources are provided below. 

                Authentic assessment | Assessment principles | Completing Statement of Assessment Methods for 2022 | Developing learning outcomesPolicy implications for assessment design | Students are engaged in authentic and experiential learning |  Using gradebook | Moderation | Providing students with comprehensive assessment information and support in FLO | Constructive alignment in FLO | Negotiated assessment


                Where to find the SAM for your topic

                The SAM is located in the Assessment module in each topic:

                 

                It shows any available SAM for your topic. If 'not available' appears in the 'Link to SAM' column, this means your SAM has either not been created or is currently in draft format and not yet published.

                SAM

                 


                Updating your SAM

                1. Login to https://flex.flinders.edu.au using your FAN and password.

                2. Click My resources


                3. Click Drafts

                4. Click the title of the Statement Assessment Methods you would like to edit


                5. Click on Edit this version under Actions



                6. In Editing mode, navigate through the SAM with the buttons at the bottom of each page, or by clicking the section links in the menu on the right




                7. Note: It is not necessary to click Save and Continue each time you navigate between sections. Once you have made all the changes, click the Save button in the top right corner.



                8. A window will pop up displaying the options: Submit for moderation, Save draft and Cancel.



                9. Once your SAM has been moderated and approved it will then be published to your topic.

                 


                Modifying a rejected SAM

                1. Go to My resources > Moderation queue to find rejected SAM



                2. Click on Show comment to view comments made from moderators      



                3. Click on the SAM title to visit the summary page



                4. On the SAM summary page, click on Moderation history to view the SAM’s editing, moderating process, and any comments.



                5. To edit a rejected SAM, click on Redraft this version.

                6. To submit a rejected SAM for moderation, click the Save and exit button in the top right corner, then click on Submit for moderation. Alternatively, you can click on Save draft to save your work for later. 


                Who to contact for help

                • For help updating your SAM (FLEX-related queries), please refer to the SAM contact in your College
                • For academic or policy-related questions, please refer to your College Dean (Education) or College Assessment Policy Working Group rep

                College For assistance with FLEX For academic or policy-related questions
                Business, Government and Law

                Email: BGLEnquiries@flinders.edu.au

                Chris Kee,
                Dean (Education) and Assessment Policy Working Group rep
                cbgl.deaneducation@flinders.edu.au

                Education, Psychology and Social Work

                Student Progress and Assessment Advisors
                Email cepsw.spaa@flinders.edu.au

                Debra Bateman
                Dean (Education)
                cepsw.deaneducation@flinders.edu.au

                Julie Clark
                Assessment Policy Working Group rep
                julie.clark@flinders.edu.au

                Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences

                Jo Smiley on 15516 | Blake Lenthall on 15840
                Email: HASSenquiries@flinders.edu.au

                Eric Bouvet
                Dean (Education) and Assessment Policy Working Group rep
                chass.deaneducation@flinders.edu.au

                Medicine and Public Health

                Email: cmph.enquiries@flinders.edu.au

                Alison Jones
                Dean (Education)
                cmph.deaneducation@flinders.edu.au

                Lambert Schuwirth
                Assessment Policy Working Group rep
                lambert.schuwirth@flinders.edu.au

                Nursing and Health Sciences

                Jane Lucadei and Brett Carter
                Email: NHSenquiries@flinders.edu.au

                Chris Barr
                Dean (Education) and Assessment Policy Working Group rep
                cnhs.deaneducation@flinders.edu.au

                Science and Engineering

                Email: cse.enquiries@flinders.edu.au

                John Roddick,
                Dean (Education)
                cse.deaneducation@flinders.edu.au

                Ingo Koeper
                Assessment Policy Working Group
                Ingo.koeper@flinders.edu.au



                Additional help materials for SAMs

                FEEDBACK

                Engaging content - polling

                Students provide responses to questions or surveys. Polling can be synchronous or asynchronous. Synchronous or real-time polling in class allows you to display and analyse the results immediately. Asynchronous polling can be used prior to a teaching session where you collect and analyse results to inform delivery of your class.

                Good practice guides and tip sheets

                Good practice guides and tip sheets have been developed to support quality in both curriculum design and teaching practice. Good practice guides provide a pedagogical overview and tip sheets provide you with practical strategies and ideas for implementation. Links to polling-related resources are provided below. 

                Design principles for creating engaging digital contentSourcing and creating digital content






                Active Quiz icon

                FLO Active Quiz

                Active Quiz is designed for in-class quizzes. The quiz uses questions from the question bank, questions can be timed/not timed, grades are reported back to the Gradebook. You can view student responses in real time to offer in-class discussion about the results. Students can use any device. Group quizzing is supported.

                Good for

                • Delivery of time-boxed questions (synchronous)
                • Multiple poll questions in one session where the availability of each question is controlled by the teacher
                • Use in-class to check understanding of materials during presentations to allow for clarification
                • Use in-class to explore class views on issues for discussion

                Useful features

                • Active quiz is a synchronous (real-time) timed quiz
                • Multiple choice (MCQ) and True-False questions will generate a dynamic histogram of answers, making them good for polling
                • Functions in group mode
                Cautions

                • In a live classroom setting, be careful what your screen is displaying – questions other than MCQ and T/F will display identified student answers
                Tips

                • Create a QR code of the Active quiz URL. Insert into your lecture presentation to make it quick and easy for students to access
                • Advise students in advance to have a suitable device. Have students log into FLO at the beginning of the class
                Help resources





                Choice iconFLO Choice

                The Choice activity allows you to ask a question and set up radio buttons which learners can click to make a selection from a number of possible responses. They can choose one or more options, and they can update their selection if you allow them. Choices can be useful as a quick poll to stimulate thinking about a topic, to allow the class to vote on a direction for the course, or to gauge progress.

                Good for

                • Asynchronous use (eg asking a question pre-class to explore class views on issues for discussion)
                • Single in-class question where time-boxing of answer is less important
                • Use at beginning of class before presentation commences
                • Use at end of class to determine comprehension

                Useful features

                • Designed as a single question asynchronous (not real time, students working on it individually at own pace/time) polling activity
                • Can be used in a live setting (synchronous/real time)
                • Can display a histogram of responses
                • Results can be exported
                • Can be run in group mode
                Limitations

                • Teacher will need to refresh their screen to display the choice results
                • Limited layout and styling control
                • Only one question per choice activity
                Tips

                • Generate a QR code form the choice URL. Add to lecture slide to take students directly to the poll
                • Advise students in advance to have a suitable device. Have students log into FLO at the beginning of the class
                Help resources

                 






                Feedback iconFLO Feedback

                The Feedback activity allows you to create and conduct surveys to collect feedback. Responses can be anonymous. There are a number of question types including MCQ, True/False and free text.
                Good for

                • Asking multiple questions, including free text
                • Asking the class what material they would like further clarification on in tutorial or revision sessions

                Useful features

                • Can deliver more than one question
                • Designed for surveying, responses can be anonymous
                • Can be used as a live activity in class
                • Results of some question types can be displayed as a histogram
                Limitations

                • Teacher needs to refresh the results page to see incoming responses
                • Limited layout and styling control
                Tips

                • Create a QR code from the feedback activity's URL. Place the QR code into a lecture slide to make it efficient for students to get to the activity on a mobile device
                • Advise students in advance to have a suitable device. Have students log into FLO at the beginning of the class
                Help resources