Thursday, 23 September 2021, 3:46 AM
Site: Flinders Learning Online
Topic: FLO Staff Support (FLO_Staff_Support)
Glossary: How-to glossary
Zoe Bogner

Database - main entry

Using a database activity in your topic is one way to allow students to create content and share it with others. Using the Database activity in a topic ideally consists of 5 stages, in a looped process.

1. Plan  |  2. Build  |  3. Test  |  4. Administer  |  5. Review  ||  Support 
  Database iconThe database activity allows teachers and students to build up a bank of structured information (a 'collection'). A database activity could be used:

  • as a collaborative collection of web links, books, book reviews, journal references etc
  • to display student-created photos, posters, websites or text for peer comment and review.
Using a database in your topic is a way to allow students to create content ('entries') and interact with others (collaborate). Students have the opportunity to teach and learn from their peers by making considered decisions about resources that require critical thinking, and supporting their choices through debate (comments). As well as being a resource in the current topic, the content created can become a legacy or resource/exemplar for another (future) topic (ie it can be rolled over).

The database entries need to be exported/imported separately if you want to use the database in another site (eg the topic's next version) – only the database shell will be copied over. Contact your eLearning support team.

Good practice guides and tip sheets

Good practice guides and tip sheets have been developed to support quality in both curriculum design and teaching practice. Good practice guides provide a pedagogical overview and tip sheets provide you with practical strategies and ideas for implementation. Links to database-related resources are provided below. 

Providing constructive feedback in FLO



    1. Plan

    The success of the database activity is in the planning. Once students begin adding content (entries), it can be tricky to change the fields, so thinking ahead is key. 

    What is the intended purpose of the database activity? 

    • What fields/questions do you want your students to answer? What format – uploading images or documents? Links? What fields are required/optional?
    • How does it link to assessment – is it an assessment item itself, or is it a step towards an assessment item (eg resource supporting assessment, digital literacy skill development)?
    • How interactive do you want the activity to be? Allow comments on entries (moderated/unmoderated)? Students/teachers rate entries? Ratings can be aggregated to form a final grade which is recorded in the Gradebook.

    The structure of the entries is defined by the teacher as a number of fields. The visual layout of information when listing, viewing or editing database entries is  controlled by templates

    When creating a database for the first time, it can be helpful to think about it like an Excel spreadsheet. The teacher creates the columns (fields), and students and/or teachers add rows of content.


    2. Build

    Once you have planned your database fields, you are ready to set up your database.

      1. Create a database activity (settings)
      2. Define database fields (preset, create your own, make your database searchable)
      3. Customise the templates (View list, View single, Add entry)

      3. Test

      The database activity is a highly customisable and very versatile tool, so it's important to test what you've built thoroughly before releasing the activity to students. Ask your local eLearning support team to check your Database for you (especially if this is your first time). It is best to amend mistakes before students add entries.

      • Practice creating an entry – as a form of scaffolding, you could support students by showing what an entry that's added looks like
      • Preview the Single, List, and Add views – is the layout is clear and easy to understand?


      4. Administer

      When setting up your database activity, you can enable a number of optional settings. Some of these settings require administration by a teacher:

      • Approve entries – If enabled, entries require approving by a teacher before they are viewable by everyone
      • Give ratings to entries – if ratings are being used for marking (settings)

      To encourage students to add entries, you could add an initial entry to model good practice, setting a standard and ensuring that instructions are not misunderstood. You could add the first entry in the Test phase). This is equivalent to making the first post in a forum. The fields you set up when you built the database will also prompt students as to what to add to create an entry. Students like examples and will engage more promptly with the tool.

      You can see how many students have contributed on the topic homepage:
      database contributions


      5. Review

      How did your database activity go? Would you set up the activity differently next time round? Talk to colleagues and/or your local eLearning support team to get ideas for improvement.

      If you are happy with the activity and you want to use the content in a future topic version/other topics, you can ask your eLearning support team to roll over or import the database activity. The entries will need to be exported/imported separately. 


        Training and support

        Troubleshooting

      Support

      eLearning support teams

      There are no known issues with this tool, but you may require help to build it.

      Timna Garnett

      Choice (poll/survey) - build a choice activity

      1. Plan  |  2. Build  |  3. Test  |  4. Administer  |  5. Review  ||  Support  

      choice iconThe choice (poll/survey) activity is a way of engaging with students in your topic, and applying a just-in-time or responsive approach to your teaching. It is an example of active teaching and feedback. Using the choice activity or a similar tool in a lecture adds interactivity.

      The choice tool enables a teacher to ask a single question and offer a selection of possible responses. 

      In this guide, find out how to:


      Create a choice activity

      1. In your topic, clickturn editing on to turn editing on
      2. In the week/module where you want to create the activity, click
        activity add
      3. Select Choice
        choice option 
      4. Give the choice a Name and Description
        name and description

      5. Under Options, enter the different options students can select.
        options
      6. If you need more spaces, click
        add three fields

      7. Under Availability, select when you want to allow the responses from and until

        Timeline block: 'Allow responses until' will show to students in the Timeline block.

      8. Under Results, select if/when results are displayed to students. Note that students only see aggregated results, they do not see who selected which option.


        Students will be told when they submit give an answer if/how their answers will be seen by others.

      9. Click
        save and display

      View the results of a choice activity

      1. In the choice activity, click on View X responses
        view 3 responses
      2. This will show votes for each option.


      Make a selection on behalf of a student

      As a teacher you can now make a selection on behalf of a student.

      1. In the choice activity, click on View X responses
      2. Select the student
      3. In the Choose an action drop down list select a preference

      Choice (poll/survey) - main entry

      Whether you are starting from scratch or working with a choice poll already created, using the choice activity in a topic ideally consists of 5 stages, in a looped process.

      1. Plan  |  2. Build  |  3. Test  |  4. Administer  |  5. Review  ||  Support 

      choice iconThe choice (poll/survey) activity is a way of engaging with students in your topic, and applying a just-in-time or responsive approach to your teaching. It is an example of active teaching and feedback. Using the choice activity or a similar tool in a lecture adds interactivity. the Active Quiz has a greater level of interactivity.

      The choice tool enables a teacher to ask a single question and offer a selection of possible responses. Choice results may be published after students have answered, after a certain date, or not at all. Results may be published with student names or anonymously. The choice can not be graded (for a gradeable alternative, check out the Active quiz). 

      Good practice guides and tip sheets

      Good practice guides and tip sheets have been developed to support quality in both curriculum design and teaching practice. Good practice guides provide a pedagogical overview and tip sheets provide you with practical strategies and ideas for implementation. Links to teaching-related resources are provided below. 

      Facilitating Student-Teacher interaction in FLO


      1. Plan

      Creating a choice activity requires you to know what you are going to ask your students. Do you have more than one question? How many options/responses are you going to offer? Is the activity going to be anonymous?

      A choice activity may be used:

      • as a quick poll to stimulate thinking about a module
      • to quickly test students' understanding (e.g. in a lecture/workshop)
      • to facilitate student decision-making (e.g. allowing students to vote on a direction for the topic)

      2. Build

      Creating a choice poll can be completed once you have the question and answers/options created.

        1. Create a choice activity
        2. View the results of a choice activity

        3. Test

        • The first time you use the Choice activity, it recommended to do so with a small group of students.
        • Preview the choice activity in FLO (Profile >Switch role to> Student)


        4. Administer

        • Be sure to check your responses and acknowledge the results  
        • Share the results with your students - either automatically through the Choice tool or afterwards using a visualisation tool, like a word cloud or pie chart

        5. Review

        Before using the same choice activity, consider reviewing your activities prior to use.

        • View the choice as a student - switch your role and vote
        • Evaluate the purpose of the choice activity - what does it add for your students? When is it best utilised?

          Training and support

          Troubleshooting

        Training

        None available

        Support

        eLearning support teams

        You may have one of the following issues:

        Choice (poll/survey) - troubleshooting

        1. Plan   2. Build  |  3. Test  |  4. Administer  |  5. Review  ||  Support  

        Questions/problems


        My students cannot see the results of my choice activity

        In the settings for the choice activity, under the Results heading, make sure the option is selected for students to view results either all the time after they have made a selection or after the activity is closed.

        Select edit settings in the choice administraion block

        select publish results


        Collaborate - planning guide

        Collaborate is a live, collaborative space that provides the ability to chat, screen-share, share audio and video, poll students, collaborate using a virtual whiteboard or group participants into small 'break-out' spaces. Using the Collaborate activity in a topic ideally consists of the following 5 stages.

        1. Plan  |  2. Build  |  3. Test  |  4. Administer  |  5. Review  ||  Support 

        Collaborate icon

        Collaborate is the official web conferencing tool for learning and teaching at Flinders University. Below is a summary of considerations when planning to use Collaborate in your teaching:

        Good practice guides and tip sheets

        Good practice guides and tip sheets have been developed to support quality in both curriculum design and teaching practice. Good practice guides provide a pedagogical overview and tip sheets provide you with practical strategies and ideas for implementation. Links to Collaborate-related resources are provided below. 

        Accessibility and inclusivity in FLO | Accessibility and Inclusivity in the Classroom | Using online teaching tools to optimise face-to-face time

        Disabled features

        To help increase the stability of the system and increase performance, the following features are temporarily disabled by the vendor:

        • Timer (a countdown timer)
        • Chat typing indicator (a visual indicator that someone is typing. Chat is otherwise functional.)
        • The number of videos showing at any one time in some browsers has been reduced from 4 to 2

         


        What do you want to achieve with Collaborate?

        Collaborate can be used for a range of different purposes: One-to-one, one-to-many and, many-to-many.

        • One to one
          • Discussion/consultation between one academic and one student
            This format usually replaces a face-to-face consultation/meeting due to distance as a barrier for staff or student. May be useful for discussing topics virtually face-to-face for remote students, including supervised research students, where a document needs to be shared on the screen (in comparison to a phone only discussion which does not require a visual sharing). Not traditionally recorded, but individual video camera advisable.

          • Presentation by an individual student for assessment purpose to one other (teacher)
            This format will replace the face-to-face aural/visual presentation due to distance as a barrier. Individual student presents to an assessor (teacher). Not traditionally recorded, but individual video camera advisable.

        • One to many
          • Group discussion between students and teacher
            This format is useful for discussing assessment requirements prior to submission, where distance or time is a barrier. Students are provided with the opportunity to ask questions of their teacher and/or peers to help clarify any confusing information associated with the assessment task. Aural discussions are more useful at clarifying points than written email or forum posts, as ideas can be expressed differently. The session can be recorded to provide the information for non-attendees. Individual (presenter) video camera advisable.

          • Tutorials and lecture-style sessions
            This format sees one presenter/teacher presenting to multiple participants, where discussion or quizzing interaction is encouraged. The session can be recorded to provide the information for non-attendees or as revision for attendees. If no interaction is encouraged for this session, then the presentation may be best recorded using video creation tools like Camtasia or the Kaltura desktop recorder, both freely available at Flinders University. Individual (presenter) video camera advisable.

          • Presentation by a student for assessment or activity to a group of students

            This format is used in classrooms, where off-site students present to an on-campus class. View the room booking list and search for 'web conferencing' to find compatible rooms.

          • Student/other is absent from a physical classroom but can participate remotely
            You can conduct Collaborate sessions in enabled rooms on campus. This means that you can bring off-campus participants (students, guest lecturers) into the physical classroom, and have off-campus participants attend your classes synchronously. 

        • Many to many
          • Group discussion between students
            This format opens communication equally between all participants in a session. Common Uses for this approach is for student peer discussion over a shared task or assessment where location is a barrier. Other uses for this approach is to discuss topics from tutorial tasks. Breaking up large groups of students into small groups for facilitating the discussion is appropriate in this format. Individual video camera and recording of the session not advisable.

          • Presentation by a group of students for assessment or other task to another group of students
            This format will replace the face-to-face aural/visual presentation due to distance as a barrier. Students present to a small group of students and an assessor (teacher). The session can be recorded to provide information for non-attendees. Individual video camera not advisable (especially as break-out rooms are not recorded).

            Collaborate can also be used in some classrooms, meaning that off-site students could present to an on-campus class or vice versa. To find compatible classrooms, view the room booking list and search for 'web conferencing'.

          • Collaborative task between students
            This format includes students sharing documents and screens to support their collaboration, such as preparing for a presentation or other activity. Individual video camera and recording of the session not advisable.


        What does Collaborate look like?

        Collaborate provides Moderators (teachers in a session) and Participants (students in a session) with a simple, clean and user-friendly interface. The following video provides a quick introduction to the Collaborate interface:

        For more information on the Collaborate interface, please see the Collaborate support material for Session Interface Update



        Things to consider when planning your session


        Moderating large numbers or rich student collaboration can quickly become difficult in an online classroom. When planning your sessions, consider the interaction that you are wanting your students to partake in. The more complex the interactions, the more likely you'll need to support your students to complete the task.

        In some circumstances (eg large sessions, break-out rooms etc.) it may be best to have multiple Moderators present to facilitate the online session. Multiple Moderators allow a presenter to concentrate on presenting while other moderators monitor the chat, provide basic technical support to students etc.


        Time Zones

        The times in Collaborate are converted and displayed according to the timezones set on the student's device. For example, if you are in Adelaide and create a session that starts at 3 pm, a student in Sydney or Melbourne will see that it starts at 3:30 pm.


        Consider the student cohort

        Before holding a formal or required session, it is worth offering one or two informal Collaborate sessions to ensure your students are familiar with the technology and are able to test their microphone and webcam (if this is required).

        It is also important to consider students with limited bandwidth (eg students located in remote locations, students using mobile devices) as some features such as screen sharing or multiple webcams require a large amount of bandwidth to stream.

        Collaborate provides many features to assist in managing differing bandwidths. You can easily determine a student's relative ability to exchange audio, video, or application sharing during a session with the new session user connectivity indicators. It will also dynamically adjust what is being displayed within the session for each participant based on their current connection. For more information on how this works, access the Network Connect support material.


        Collaborate recordings for future use

        Collaborate recordings will be retained for the life of the FLO topic or 1 year. If you wish to reuse a recording from one topic availability to another, you'll need to download the recording and upload it to your Media Vault.

        If the recording is not capturing any collaboration or participation, it may be worth considering desktop video recording tools such as Camtasia or the Kaltura desktop recorder.


        Allowing students to moderate their own sessions

        The course room can be used by students and this does not require a staff member to be present - students can access the Course Room at any time from any device. By default, a Participants role allows them to share their audio and video. To find out more about roles in Collaborate, access the 'What can the different roles do' support materials.

        If you'd like your students to have all of the permissions that a Moderator has, your Course Room can be altered to give any person that enters Moderator (or Presenter) permissions. This will provide students with the collaborative tools outlined in the 'Collaborative sharing tools' section.

        Moderator for student

         

        Using Collaborate for assessment

        Please contact your College eLearning team to talk through considerations around using Collaborate for assessment purposes.


        Accessibility

        Collaborate has been built with enhanced accessibility features including support for JAWS, VoiceOver, Live Closed Captioning, Keyboard Navigation and Screen readers. For more information on these features, see the following information:



        Collaborative and sharing tools

        Collaborate provides several tools to share content and engage with session participants. These tools are as follows:

        • Breakout groups: Split participants within the session into small groups for collaboration
        • Chat: Text chat with all participants (chat also allows a restricted chat between Moderators)
        • Polling: Poll Participants with simple polls such as True / False or using 1 - 4 options that you define
        • Document or screen sharing: Either share your screen or upload a document to present to all participants

          Supported file types for uploaded documents include: .ppt, .pptx, .pdf and supported image files include: .gif, .jpeg, .png. It is recommended that you upload PowerPoint / PDF files rather than share your screen as this requires less bandwidth for all participants and increases the accessibility of the content

        The following video provides an overview of these sharing tools:

         



        Software, equipment, teaching spaces and telephone dialling

        Software

        For modern browsers, Collaborate does not require the installation of additional software or plugins. Flinders recommends using Google Chrome (latest available version) and Google Chrome version 79+ is required to utilise the application sharing and break-out room features.

        For staff computers managed by Flinders University, we recommend checking the Software Centre to ensure you have the most recent version of Google Chrome installed. Instructions on using the Software Centre.

        More information on system requirements.


        Equipment

        When enabling your microphone or webcam in Collaborate, you'll need to provide Google Chrome permission to activate and transmit your webcam. Please refer to the Collaborate support materials when using Google Chrome.

        Video/webcam: When using Google Chrome, Collaborate is able to transmit up to five videos and audio (webcam and microphone) streams. Although more microphones and webcams can be enabled, Collaborate prioritises the top five based on who is currently speaking. There may be a slight delay while Collaborate re-enables a microphone/webcam for a participant that Collaborate has previously muted.

        Audio: It is recommended that any user who is speaking uses a headset with a microphone or uses the teleconference number to reduce the occurrence of background noise and feedback. Although Collaborate has echo cancellation built-in, using a headset will give the best experience. If a student does not have a headset, we advise requesting the student to use the teleconference number.

        Video chat kits are available for loan to academic staff for use in desktop video conferencing, virtual classroom sessions (eg Collaborate) or recording short videos for FLO. Each eLearning support team has:

        • 2 webchat kits (consisting of a webcam and USB headset)
        • 1 web group chat kit (consisting of a webcam and a Bluetooth microphone/speaker).
        An introductory PowerPoint slide for Collaborate (available here) can be placed as a starting slide to help students get started and troubleshoot common technical issues.

        Please contact your local eLearning support team for further details and booking.


        Teaching spaces and meeting rooms

        Flinders University has a number of teaching spaces and meeting rooms suitable for Collaborate. Please refer to the room booking list to see rooms that support web conferencing (including classrooms).

        IDS have produced a user guide for using Collaborate in a classroom.


        Telephone dialling / Teleconference number

        Collaborate allows users (moderators and participants) to listen/talk into a session by dialling into a telephone number and enter the session PIN (please note: each pin is unique to a session and an individual user in that session) - commonly referred to as teleconferencing. This is useful if a participant does not have the correct equipment, or is struggling to enable their microphone. Each participant receives a unique PIN for each session they enter (PIN is available within the Session Menu) and can dial into a local or international number to participate within the session. For help using this functionality click here.

        The local number for Adelaide is +61 8 7100 1859.



        Support for mobile browsers

        Collaborate works on mobile phones for participants and presenters, but some of the presentation features are limited.


        What mobile browsers does Collaborate work on?

        Collaborate supports the browsers on recent versions of iOS and Android. The Collaborate website has further details on what these are.

        Older mobile phones may work, but there is no guarantee that all features will work correctly.


        Features available on mobile browsers
        • Audio, video and chat are available
        • Breakout rooms and polling are available
        • Staus and feedback (e.g. raising hands) is available

        Screen sharing

        • You cannot initiate screen sharing on a mobile browser
        • Students on mobile browsers can view screen sharing started by other people

        File sharing

        • Files stored on your phone can be shared
        • Files previously uploaded to the room can be shared
        • On an iPhone, files stored in other third-party apps (e.g. OneDrive) are not accessible
        • On Android, files stored in other third-party apps (e.g. OneDrive) can be accessed

        Lesson - main entry

        When using a lesson tool to provide a linear or non-linear way through content and activities using an interactive approach, the five stage looped process described below will assist with making the most out of this tool.

        1. Plan  |  2. Build  |  3. Test  |  4. Administer  |  5. Review  ||  Support 

        Lesson iconThe lesson tool enables a teacher to deliver content and/or practice activities in interesting and flexible ways. A teacher can use the lesson to create a linear or nonlinear lessons. Created using a combination of content pages and/or question page, the lesson tool offers a variety of paths or options for the learner. Depending on how the lesson is set up, teachers can choose to increase engagement and ensure understanding by including a variety of questions, such as multiple choice, matching and short-answer. Depending on the student's choice of answer and how the teacher develops the lesson, students may progress to the next page, be taken back to a previous page, or redirected down a different path entirely.

        The lesson tool may be used for a range of purposes, such as:

        • for self-directed learning of a new topic or module
        • for scenarios or simulations/decision-making exercises
        • to provide students with guided steps (instructions) for learning activity(ies)
        • for self-assessment/knowledge checks
        • to test understanding of content (eg a post-lecture tutorial)
        • for differentiated revision, with different sets of revision questions depending upon answers given to initial questions.

        Example in FLO

        To get started, it is worth reviewing an example interactive activity built in the lesson tool. The digital safety awareness training lesson activity was built for students in EDUC3618 to introduce them to common dangers of technologies. What features of this lesson do you like and would consider using? What ideas have you drawn from reviewing another lesson? How can you use this knowledge to plan your own lesson? 

        The lesson tool is adaptable for presenting content and questions to students in an interactive way, similar to elearning authoring tools such as Adobe Captivate and Articulate Storyline, without the steep learning curve or SCORM FLO integration problems.


        1. Plan

        A lesson activity is used to direct students through content and sometimes questions in an interactive way. While the lesson tool layout looks like a slide-by-slide approach, the design is set to ensure easy navigation through the 'slides' of content and into relevant questions. It is a worthwhile exercise to first plan/map the 'slides' you will need and what content will be placed upon them. 

        Try drawing the pages on a piece of paper to help you visualise the slides and how they will link to each other – will it be in a straight line (linear) or, based on the student response, direct them to another section or question (non-linear)? Make sure the pathways are logical and avoid the student going around in circles or getting lost. It must make sense to them if they are to learn from the experience, otherwise it is a frustrating and distracting exercise.

        Planning tips 

         Whether you are starting from scratch or revising a current lesson (which could incorporate student feedback), these prompts may help: 

        • What principle/knowledge are you delivering – does the lesson item enable this? 
        • Line up lesson components against the learning objectives/outcomes (you could include this information in the introductory page) 
        • Connect the activities within the lesson with Bloom's level/s of taxonomy – again, what is being taught/learnt? 
        • Be creative – you could use a scenarios structure, embed videos or other resources, provide learning pathways (eg hints, tips, more information, think again) for students' choices 
        • Provide opportunities for students to check their understanding without summative assessment
         


        2. Build

        You have planned your lesson and are now ready to set up your first lesson activity. 

          1. The settings
          2. Build a lesson


          3. Test

          The purpose of testing your lesson is to determine if the steps you have provided behalf as expected and to ensure the content displays as expected.

          • Switch roles (Profile>Switch role to...>Student) to preview the lesson as your students will


          4. Administer

          The requirement to manage your lesson will depend if you have any questions included in the lesson and whether these are graded or not.



          5. Review

          It is recommended that your review your lesson activity prior to each use (availability) if the lesson has graded content.


            Training and support

            Troubleshooting

          Training

          Not currently available. Request one-on-one training from your eLearning support teams.

          Support

          eLearning support teams

          There are no reported issues.

          Lesson - manage/assess

          1. Plan  |  2. Build  |  3. Test  |  4. Administer  |  5. Review  ||  Support  

          lesson iconLesson tool reports can be accessed within the activity if questions have been included in the build phase. 



          Steps for assessing a lesson

          You can review two components of the lesson tool: attempt by user (including date and time) and grades (if enabled during initial set up). 

          example report

          Reports can be accessed in the lesson tool, next to the edit tab. 

          Grades can be set up in the tool settings to report into Gradebook. Grades can only be generated for lessons with at least one question. Grades are only calculated when a student has completed the lesson.


          Lesson - settings and building

          1. Plan  |  2. Build  |  3. Test  |  4. Administer  |  5. Review  ||  Support  

          Lesson iconThis entry relates to the Lesson activity.

          When building inside a lesson tool, consider the planning stage as a chance to step out the pages of content and questions you will be incorporating. The choice of settings and success during the building phase will be reflected by your planning efforts:



          Steps

          Add a lesson activity to FLO: The settings 

          It is good practice to plan your content pages and any questions (if required) before starting to build a lesson. The purpose of your lesson will be determine the settings you choose when you create the lesson, especially around reporting the results of any questions used during the lesson (are they being graded and need to be in Gradebook, or are they for revision only). The better your planning/preparation, the less likely you are to run into a problems later on.

          Once you have planned your lesson on paper, use this structure to help you start the build process 

          1. Turn editing on using the green button – this button is available top left of screen on the topic homepage 
            Turn editing on

          2. Go to the module where you would like the Lesson activity to appear

          3. Click the Add an activity or resource link at the bottom of the module
            Add an activity or resource link

          4. Select Lesson from Activities tab
            lesson add

          5. Now edit the following settings:
            1. General: give the lesson a name and a description (if required) 

            2. Appearance: Open the Appearance section and select Show more... Decide which features you would like to display to the students. Common functions include a Display menu if navigation is to be open or the Progress bar if you would like the students to see their progress through the lesson. The Link to next activity is also a useful function, for at the end of a lesson, students can be linked to another activity or resource in FLO. 

            3. Availability: set the availability, due date (deadline) or set a time limit for completion. Password protection can also be enabled if desired.
              Timeline block: The 'Deadline' will show to students in the Timeline block.

            4. Flow control: settings associated with the progress through the lesson, such as retaking questions if answered incorrectly or how many attempts you wish to allow. 

            5. Grade: set the grading type, maximum grade and pass mark.

            6. Common module settings: section enables settings for groups and grouping  (optional)

            7. Restrict Access: place restrictions according to prior activity completion, date, grade, the user profile or complex restriction sets (optional)

            8. Activity completion: determine completion tracking for the activity based on view, grade, end reached, time spent or date completed (optional)


          Build a lesson activity
          1. Building a lesson is an important phase of the process in using this activity tool in FLO. How it functions and looks will enable your students to get the most out of the experience. Once you have added the tool (as described above), you will be ready to add content and questions (optional) and provide your students with 'next step' buttons. Any empty lesson tool is as below.
            empty lesson

          2. To build the lesson, you will need to add a content page or question page. Cluster pages can be used in more advanced lessons (for providing your user with choice with the lesson). All editing must be accessed through the Edit tab.

          3. content page requires a page title, page contents and at least one button to connect to the page/question required. The Page Contents is what will be displayed to your viewer/user. Use the text editor and media buttons to add content. Keep it simple and clear.

          4. question page requires a question type selection. This tool has six types of questions available: Essay, Matching, Multiple choice, Numerical, Short answer and True/false. Make your selection before following the prompts to edit the question page. Here you will need to provide a page title, page contents (the question), and at least one answer. It is encouraged to provide a response for each answer, ensure the 'jump' option is directing where the student is directed (for a correct and incorrect answer, and how many points (score) is connected to the question. 

          For more information on building in the Lesson module, review more detailed documentation from Moodle.

          Progress - activity completion tracking (set up and monitor)

          1. Plan  |  2. Build  |  3. Test  |  4. Administer  |  5. Review  ||  Support  

          tick box To set up completion tracking for your FLO site, consider the following phases:

          Steps


          Enable completion tracking

          1. Completion tracking is a topic-wide setting that allows you select a 'completion' option for the items in your site. When completion tracking is turned on, you have the option to activate it for the activity or tool. Even with completion tracking turned on, items are set to off, so you have to manually enable it for each item where it makes sense to do so.

          2. To enable completion tracking in your FLO site, Topic Management > Edit settings > Completion tracking and change to Yes to enable completion tracking. Save settings to apply.

          enable completion tracking image



          Set up and integrate activity completion

          1. Once 'Completion tracking' is enabled, each individual resource or activity can have 'Activity completion' turned on.
          2. Enable 'Activity completion' during the set-up procedures for each activity/resource you wish to track and the action associated with the tracking (manual or conditional completion)
          3. Add the activity or resource by clicking on the link in the module: Add an activity or resource linkor edit an existing activity
          4. Scroll down to Activity completion
          5. Select manual or conditional from the drop-down menu 

          The settings you are provided with are available as either manual or conditional, which are related to the tracking function.

          1. Completion tracking (behaviour)

            • Manual: students can manually mark the activity as complete (students see a box to tick when they have finished with that item)
            • Conditional: show activity as complete when conditions are met (select conditions and dates that apply)

          activity completion settings

          1. Require view: Student must view this activity to complete it. By ticking this box, you are declaring the action (behaviour) of the student is to view the item and make no other changes/additions. This option only works for Show activity as complete when conditions are met is selected.

          2. When an activity is added that has additional requirements possible, you are able to determine if a 'completion' is related to the grade (assessment submission, quiz etc) or entries (forum, glossary, etc). This is useful when describing to students what constitutes 'completion' of an activity. Example: Students are required to post into a forum, and to comment on someone else's post, within a certain timeframe (conditional).

          completions tracking conditions

          1. Expect completed on: Provide a date and enable it if you wish to use 'expected dates' in your site. This is useful for assessments or in preparation tasks for workshops or lectures.
          Timeline block: The 'Expect completed on' date will show to students in the Timeline block, marked as 'should be completed'. If an activity has a due date (or closing date, deadline, etc.) two dates will show - the due date and 'expect completed on' date.

          1. Save


          Monitor activity completion

          1. In the topic, click the Topic Management button
            Topic management button

          2. Click on Activity completion in the User Links menu
            Activity completion

          3. View the students and activities/resources on screen. Three types of 'completion' exist – manual, automated and overridden:

            a tick in a grey solid-line boxManual: a tick in a solid-line box appears when a student has manually ticked the item off
            a tick in a grey dotted-line boxAutomated: a tick in a dotted-line box appears when the condition of the activity/resource set within the activity/resource settings
            a tick in a red solid-line boxOverridden: a tick in a red box appears if an academic manually records that a student has completed a task.

          4. To download a spreadsheet format (UTF-8.csv) or Excel-compatible format (.csv) report, click on the Download in... button. 


          Manually override activity completion

          If activity completion does not reflect a student's achievement (e.g. amended assessments, technical errors) you can mark it as complete on their behalf.

          1. In the Administration tab, click on Reports then Activity completion

          2. Click on an empty box to mark it complete. The cell will now have a blue tick and a red border.

            Click on a box to mark that a student has completed that task


          Bulk select activities/resources for completion tracking

          You are unlikely to want all items in your FLO site to have completion tracking set up, as this may include labels that are headings, or resources that are optional. You can bulk edit activity completion, which fast tracks the selection process.

          1. Set up activity completion for the topic (instructions above)

          2. In your topic homepage, under the Administration tab, select Topic completion

          3. In the next screen, click on the tab Bulk edit activity completion

            bulk edit activity completion

          4. Select the activities/resources you want to edit, and click on the Edit button. In the next screen, choose options, and if relevant, a completion date

            Timeline block: The 'Expect completed on' date will show to students in the Timeline block, marked as 'should be completed'. If an activity has a due date (or closing date, deadline, etc.) two dates will show - the due date and 'expect completed on' date.

            bulk selection image

          5. Click Save and return to topic or Save and display

          Progress - completion progress block

          1. Plan  |  2. Build  |  3. Test  |  4. Administer  |  5. Review  ||  Support  

          The 'completion progress' block is a time management tool for students and a potential preparedness tracker for staff. The block is a flexible, visual block option to show students what activities and resources are required to enable them to chart their progress through assessments, a module or a topic. The colour-coded block shows students what they have and haven't done to complete/view required tasks, with or without expected due dates. Teaching staff can see an overview of students' progress using the same colour code system by accessing the student overview (see below) or using the completion tracking Activity Completion report.



                Add the progress block

                1. Click the Turn editing on button. 

                Turn editing on

                2. Click on the Topic Blocks button in the top right corner of your topic’s home page.

                3. Go to Add a block... and select Completion Progress

                Add completion progress block

                4. FLO will reload and the Completion Progress block will appear in your list ready for configuration


                Configure the progress block

                1. Set up (configure) the criteria for the Completion Progress block by opening the Configure Completion Progress block from the cog symbol on the block (editing must be enabled). 

                configure completion tracking block

                2. Review and adjust the block settings, including the order of blocks, the presentation and any symbols you wish to use. 

                completion block settings

                3. Open Show more... section for adding an alternative title and selecting the components you wish to display. By default, all activities with completion set will be added to the block. Change this to Selected activities and then select the activities from the list below. Hold the Ctrl key down to select multiple activities. 

                show more completing tracking

                4. Open the Where this block appears section. So that students have a consistent navigation, change the default region to column A, and the default weight to 4. Then open the On this page section and repeat these steps.

                completion block appearance

                5. Save your changes when you are finished.


                View students' progress

                1. To view the statistics of student's progress for activities/resources listed in the 'Completion Progress' block, click Overview of students on the block. 

                completion progress block overview

                2. Filter the list to all students or other roles using the Role drop-down filter. If groups are set up, the option to filter by a group is available.

                overview of students 

                3. Hover mouse over the 'Progress bar' colours to view details. 

                4. Alternatively, use the 'Progress' percentage column (if turned on) to view the overall progress of the activities/resources. 

                CP overview


          Progress - digital badges

          1. Plan  |  2. Build  |  3. Test  |  4. Administer  |  5. Review  ||  Support  

          The 'digital badges' feature in FLO is a game element that can be used in education to celebrate achievements and show progress in a topic.

          In FLO, badges can be created by teachers and awarded to students. Badges integrates with completion tracking/activity completion settings, to customise trigger points that determine the automatic release of badges. Badges may also be awarded manually based on the combination of FLO activities within a topic and physical activities in the classroom, such as practical skills. All badges may be awarded by a combination of summative or formative tasks. Badges are privately visible in a user's FLO profile or imported into Badgr.com, which enables sharing through social media sites like Facebook and Google Plus. The following guide provides information on: 


          Steps

          How to use digital badges

          Current research literature agrees that the digital badge is: a visual symbol of an accomplishment, skill or recognisable trait that deserves acknowledgement; contains metadata to explain the context of the award; can be shared digitally across social communities, and should be broadly identified as a digital badge. 

          Examples of how digital badges can be used in higher education include: 

          • an alternatives to grades (micro-credentialing) (Clayton et al., 2014; Elliott et al., 2014); 
          • to support the process of progressing through research degrees (Mewburn et al., 2014); 
          • assessing individual students in collaboration assignments (Moccozet, 2013); 
          • as an introduction to navigating a physical campus through a scavenger hunt exploration (Koutropoulos, 2012);
          • to motivate students in an online course (Foli et al., 2016); 
          • measuring clinical performance and GPA recognition (Hannas, 2016); and 
          • as a record of achievement for future employers (Thomas, 2014). 

          Sources: 

          Clayton, J., Elliott, R., Iwata, J., 2014. Exploring the use of micro-credentialing and digital badges in learning environments to encourage motivation to learn and achieve. ASCILITE. 

          Elliott, R., Clayton, J., Iwata, J., 2014. Exploring the use of micro-credentialing and digital badges in learning environments to encourage motivation to learn and achieve, in: Hegarty, B., McDonald, J., Loke, S.-K. (Eds.), Ascilite 2014. Ascilite, Dunedin, NZ., pp. 703-707. 

          Foli, K.J., Karagory, P., Kirby, K., 2016. An exploratory study of undergraduate nursing students' perceptions of digital badges. Journal of Nursing Education 55, 640-644. Hannas, J., 2016. Demystifying digital badges. California State University Channel Islands, California.

          Koutropoulos, A., 2012. Mobile Gamification for increasing motivation and engagement around the campus. International Journal of Instructional Technology and Distance Learning 9, 3-20. 

          Mewburn, I., Freund, K., Rutherford, E., 2014. Badge trouble: piloting open badges at the Australian National University. Ascilite 

          Moccozet, L., Tardy, C., Opprecht, W. & Leonard, M., 2013. Gamification-based assessment of group work, International Conference on Interactive Collaborative Learning, pp. 171-179. 

          Thomas, A., 2014. Nursing faculty and students implement Passport badges to measure learning, achievement. Purdue University Informaion Technology Purdue University Information Technology



          Getting started with digital badges

          When designing topics for the inclusion of FLO digital badges, consider the following key points:

          • How may digital badges be used in your topic? - What 'stages' do you want to create in a student's journey through your topic? Are there layers? Are the badges skill-based or knowledge-based?
          • How will the visual appeal of the badge encourage users? - What visual element will you use for your creating badges? How will you create them? Visual appeal is an important component in using digital badges as a motivator.
          • Which activities/resources are required to measure a student's completion of a module or topic or success at demonstrating a skill? Can these be automated or do they require manual measuring?
          • Can digital badges be integrated with other motivation methods, such as progress bars? Research shows that a combination of methods will motivate a greater range of individuals.
          • Organise with your eLearning support team to activate badges in your topic. Currently, digital badges do not roll from semester to semester. 
          • How will you communicate with your students about the use of digital badges? It is important to communicate with your students about the role of the digital badges, as they are immediately visible as they must be earned.
          • View a short video (7 mins)  on what are digital badges, how to set them up and how to share them outside of FLO. See the video to the right (for logged in FLO users only).
           
          If the video does not appear above click here or sign in to view: Introduction to digital badges.


          Add digital badges into your FLO site

          Creating badges

          Once badges have been activated in your site and you have sourced/created your badge images (100x100), you are ready to create your badges in FLO. 

          1. Click the hamburger button on the top menu bar -> select Badges -> Add a new badge button.

          Add%20a%20badges.jpg

          badges_nav

          add_a_new_badge

          2. Enter the badge details, including name, description and the image you have created for the badge. Update the image author's details (your details) and if required, add a badge expiry date. Save your badge details by selecting Create badge.

          Create%20badge.jpg           

          3. Select your badge criteria: Manual issue by role, Topic completion, Activity completion or competencies.

          Criteria%202.jpg           

                     

          4. Modify the existing message, avoiding altering the auto-filled text (in red below)

          message.jpg           

          5. Once the criteria has been set, Enable access to the badge. All badges can be created at any time but are not released to the students until this button has been clicked.

          Once the badge has been enabled, no further editing can be undertaken.

          activity%20completion%202.jpg



          Manage badges: Badge availability

          Once badges have been activated in your site and created (added) to FLO: 

          1. Click the hamburger button on the top menu bar -> select Badges. -> Manage badges.

          manage badge

          badges nav

          digital badges sandpit

          2. Here you'll see the complete list of digital badges added to the topic. Note that some badges may be available to users (they have been enabled) and some badges may not be available to users (they are yet to be enabled).  

          manage availability           

          3. Select the badge you wish to 'manage' by clicking on the badge name. This will load the badge details. On an available badge, the criteria will be locked. This may be disabled, however, the badges that have been earned prior to the disable will not be deleted. The badge will simply not be able to be earned by new students.

          badge detail           

          *Note, that once a badge has been issued to at least one user, it automatically becomes LOCKED. Locked badges can still be earned by users, but their criteria can no longer be changed. If you need to modify details or criteria of a locked badge, you can duplicate this badge and make all the required changes. 

          4. To re-enable, that is, to make it visible and active for students to earn based on the pre-set criteria, select the  enable access button. Note that if this badge was previously enabled, the following warning will appear. 

          enable warning           

          Click Continue to re-active the badge. This will issue the badge to any student who has completed the criteria during the badges inactive stage. 



          Manage badges: Deleting badges

          Once badges have been awarded, the badge can be deleted using the FLO X icon or course badges in your site and created (added) to FLO: 

          1. Click the hamburger button on the top menu bar -> select Badges. -> Manage badges.

          manage badge

          badges nav

          manage badges

          2. Here you'll see the complete list of digital badges added to the topic. Note that some badges may be available to users (they have been enabled) and some badges may not be available to users (they are yet to be enabled)

          3. Regardless of availability, you are able to delete a created digital badge. 

          Select the badge you wish to 'manage' by identity which row in the table (see below). Navigate to the Actions column and select thebin

          delete option             

          The two options for the deletion will be presented: 1. To delete and keep existing issued badge or 2. to delete and remove existing issued badges.

          delete options             

          Follow the prompts once you have made your selection.

          Note that once you have deleted the badge from FLO, the badge may still exist if it was exported to an external backpack, but the awarded criteria will not be tracked



          Progress - main entry

          The act of monitoring progress can be supported by several tools in FLO: the digital badge, completion progress block, activity completion and restrict access functionality. 

          1. Plan  |  2. Build  |  3. Test  |  4. Administer  |  5. Review  ||  Support 

          The adoption of progress tools, either one or more of these available tools, should be used to help you and your students stay motivated and on track, and yet provide opportunities for targeted support. Consider the five-stage process below for each progress tool. 


          1. Plan

          Planning to use digital badges, completion progress block, activity completion tracking and restrict access should be considered to provide students with an interactive and visual method of motivating participation in your class, using the online (FLO) platform as a mechanism for charting progress.

          Digital badges considerations
          • How may digital badges will be used in your topic? What 'stages' do you want to create in a student's journey through your topic? Are there layers? Are the badges skill based or knowledge based?
          • How will the visual appeal of the badge encourage users? What visual element will you use for your creating badges? How will you create them? Visual appeal is an important component in using digital badges as a motivator.
          • Which activities/resources are required to measure a student's completion of a module or topic or success at demonstrating a skill? Can these be automated, or do they require manual measuring?
          • Can digital badges be integrated with other motivation methods, such as progress bars? Research shows that a combination of methods will motivate a greater range of individuals.
          • Organise with your eLearning support team to activate badges in your topic. Currently, digital badges do not roll from semester to semester. 
          • How will you communicate with your students about the use of digital badges? It is important to communicate with your students about the role of the digital badges, as they are immediately visible and they must be earned.

          Completion progress block uses
          • Self-directed learning of a new topic or module or series of tasks.
          • Enabling self-paced tracking in a topic and/or module.
          • Providing students with guided requirements for learning activity(ies) and resources.
          • Targeting preparation for assessment or class attendance.
          Activity completion considerations

          The activity completion can be used to track students' access and completion status of all activities or resources which have this feature enabled. 

          • What activities/resources should you provide students the ability to track using this feature?
          • Will students manually mark activities/resources as completed or will this be automated - or both?
          • How often will you monitor the students' progress?
          • What expected interventions will you use?
          Restrict access considerations
          • What do you need to restrict and why?
          • Are you using groups, previous activities, or dates to restrict access?
          • How will you communicate this to your students?


          2. Build

          Describe readiness to continue. [You have planned your topic. Now you are ready to set up.]

          Digital badges

          All entries available at 'Progress - Digital badges'

          Completion progress block

          All entries available at 'Progress - Completion progress block

          Activity completion tracking

          All entries available at 'Progress - Activity completion tracking (Set up and monitor)'

          Restrict access



          3. Test

          • Using progress settings in your FLO site should be attempted at a level that does not impact student success. 
          • Communicate with your students what progress tools are available and how they may be used to enhance their learning.


          4. Administer

          It is recommended that you use the progress tools (defined as digital badges, progress block and activity completion settings) for a student-focused purpose, whilst making use of the reporting feature for informing best learning and teaching practices.


          5. Review

          It is advisable that students or other teaching staff are consulted following the use of the feature(s) to ensure a review of their use is conducted at least once a year. 

          Training and support

          Troubleshooting

          Training
          No 'Progress' workshops currently available

          Support
          eLearning support teams

          No reported problems with 'Progress' tools

          Progress - restrict access

          1. Plan  |  2. Build  |  3. Test  |  4. Administer  |  5. Review  ||  Support  

          The restrict access feature allows you to restrict the availability of activities, resources or whole modules according to certain conditions.


          Steps

          1. With editing turned on, either:
            • click on Add an activity or resource to add an item to your topic
            • edit the settings of an existing item
            • edit the settings of an existing module

          2. Click on Restrict access to open the settings

          3. Click on the Add restriction... button to open the restriction list
            restrict access

          4. Select the type of restriction from the restriction list
            restriction

          5. You can add multiple restrictions to the same activity or resource, by selecting the Add restriction button again


          6. If you have multiple restrictions you can choose whether students have to meet either one or all of the restrictions you've listed.
            The all or any option is at the top of the 'restrict access' section
            If students need to meet some but not all of the restrictions (e.g. different cohorts need access from different dates), use the restriction set (see step 4) to join those restrictions together.

          7. Students can see the existence of restricted items by default (they won't be able to access them by default, but will know that they exist). To only show a restricted item to those who have access to it, click on the eye icon so that there is a line running through it. Depending on how your restrictions are set up, the eye may appear in different (and multiple) places.

            If your restriction is based on private information (e.g. personal data or grades) you should always make it hidden.


          8. Click either Save and return to topic or Save changes when finished.

            Restrictions you place on an activity or resource will display underneath the item.
            alert

            Restrictions you place on a module will display underneath the heading for the module.

          Video - lecture

          1. Plan  |   2. Build   |  3. Test   |  4. Administer  |  5. Review  ||   Support  

          Lecture icon A lecture recording. The video has two areas of focus - a small picture of the lecturer and a large picture of a PowerPoint.The Lecture resource is used to display lecture recordings to students. Any class timetabled as a lecture in a compatible room is automatically recorded and added to your FLO site, usually one week before the topic starts.

          All topics have a lecture recordings block that can be used to manage existing recordings and book additional recordings.

          Good practice guides and tip sheets

          Good practice guides and tip sheets have been developed to support quality in both curriculum design and teaching practice. Good practice guides provide a pedagogical overview and tip sheets provide you with practical strategies and ideas for implementation. Links to lecture recording-related resources are provided below. 

          Making the most of your lecture recording



          What do recordings look like in FLO?

          In your FLO topic, the recordings display as links, as shown below. The links will automatically be created on the topic home page, one week before the start of the topic.
          The icon for a lecture is a white piece of paper, with yellow markings.

          After the lecture has been recorded, video and audio recordings are made available for students to play or download through either FLO, iTunes, or an RSS reader.

          Livestreaming of lectures is also available for classes held in major lecture theatres. This can be arranged through the lecture recordings block.


          Booking additional recordings

          Each topic has a Lecture recordings block where you can view what is being recorded for your topic, and you can request classes other than lectures be recorded. 

          1. Open the Topic Blocks and click on the link in the lecture recordings block.
            Lecture recordings block
          2. Click on the Booking form link.

            The booking form link is in the top left section of the page. In this image it is marked with a red border.
          3. On the booking form, enter the applicable dates, start time, duration and room number



          Editing lecture recordings

          Renaming lectures

          Lectures can be renamed in FLO, and it is a great way to provide more meaningful information to students.

          To rename a lecture, turn editing on in your topic and click on the pencil icon to the right of the topic name. Types in your changes and hit the enter key to save them.

          The pencil icon appears after the lecture name. In this image, it is marked with a red border.

          Removal of content

          IDS can provide limited support of editing for sensitive information and private conversations. View the lecture recording FAQs for further information

          Moving lecture recordings

          Lecture recording can be moved the same as any other activity in FLO, and may be necessary if the recordings are placed in the wrong location. When you have editing turned on, you can click and drag the crosshairs to the left of the lecture to move it to its desired location.


          Livestreaming lectures

          In addition to being recorded, lectures can be livestreamed to students unable to attend. To livestream a lecture:

          1. Open the Topic Blocks and click on the link in the lecture recordings block.
            Lecture recordings block

          2. Tick the box next to Display Live Broadcast of Lectures in FLO

            tick the box next to 'Display live Broadcast of Lectures in FLO'


          Cancelling a recording

          If a lecture is not going to be held you can stop the lecture from being recorded. Be aware that if the lecture is running and you are trying to cancel the recording only, you will need to request an exemption first.

          Deleting the recording from the FLO site will not be sufficient – it will still be recorded and provided through iTunes and RSS feeds.

          To cancel a recording:

          1. Open the Topic Blocks and click on the link in the Lecture recordings block.
            Lecture recordings block

          2. Click on the Do not record link for the relevant lecture
            The 'Do not record' link appears next to the green 'Published' message


          Manual self-recording

          Any room that can automatically record a lecture can also be used to manually record other activities.

          To record in a room, turn the AV system on, insert a USB stick into the plug in the presenter's desk, and use the buttons on the touch panel to record yourself. For further details, go to the Audio Visual Services website.

          If you wish to record a regular event (such as a seminar or tutorial) you can request that these be recorded automatically. For more information, view the Lecture recording FAQs and click on 'Can I record tutorials, workshops, seminars and other activities?' (near the top of the page).


          Frequently asked questions

          The lecture recording FAQs have a range of questions on a wide range of issues, including:

          • How to use the room equipment
          • Controlling the cameras
          • Tips for producing high quality recordings
          • What happens if the technology fails
          • Reusing lecture recordings
          • Getting part of a recording removed for copyright or confidentiality reasons

          Lecture recording FAQs


            Training and support

            Troubleshooting

          Support
          eLearning support teams

          Video - main entry

          This entry explores ways to plan, create and use your own (self-created) videos in your FLO topics. Some very helpful research-based recommendations for engaging students through video are explored in the blog article How MOOC video production affects student engagement, which you may like to read first.

          For information about lecture recording videos, please see the Lecture capture entry.

          1. Plan  |  2. Build  |  3. Test  |  4. Administer  |  5. Review  ||  Support 

          You can use videos in learning and teaching for a number of purposes:

          • Use a short, informal video to introduce the teaching team - a welcome video
          • Produce mini-lectures which target important or commonly misunderstood concepts
          • Produce content for revision or elaborate on an assessment item
          • Use video in peer assessment and feedback practices
          • Encourage students to present knowledge and understanding through video
          • Capture unique experiences or perspectives through an interview with industry experts

          Tools for recording video 

          Video chat kits are available for loan to academic staff for use in desktop video conferencing, virtual classroom sessions (eg Collaborate), or recording short videos for FLO. Each eLearning support team has:

          • 2 web chat kits (consisting of a webcam and USB headset)
          • 1 web group chat kit (consisting of a webcam and a Bluetooth microphone/speaker).

          Equipment can be booked via the eLearning store booking system.

          A range of free and University-supplied tools are available for you to record video footage, ranging from screen capture software to the professional recording studios.

          Good practice guides and tip sheets

          Good practice guides and tip sheets have been developed to support quality in both curriculum design and teaching practice. Good practice guides provide a pedagogical overview and tip sheets provide you with practical strategies and ideas for implementation. Links to video-related resources are provided below. 

          Considerations associated with planning the creation of videos for teachingDesign principles for creating engaging digital content



          1. Plan

          What is the key message or purpose of the video? Is it a quick communication or should it be a highly produced, reusable resource? Knowing the answers to these questions will influence what tools you use and how much time you invest in planning and production. A storyboard or script may be an important component in planning a video, depending on how complex your video needs to be.



          2. Build

          You have numerous options for recording and editing videos. For simpler videos, you could just record on a mobile phone/tablet, or use the Kaltura Desktop Recorder to record using your computer's webcam or screen. If your video needs to be more highly produced and have a longer lifespan as a learning resource, then you might consider using more advanced tools/resources, like the video editing software Camtasia or Recording Studios located at Sturt South, Central Library and Social Science South. And of course, you can also record lectures using the lecture capture facilities in equipped rooms.


          Record on a phone or tablet

          For informal, quick-to-produce videos that don't need editing, you may like to record on a phone or tablet. Remember to record in landscape orientation, not portrait! You can upload videos recorded on mobile devices into My Media (Kaltura) for embedding in FLO.

          View these videos on recording with a mobile device:


          Kaltura Desktop Recorder in FLO

          The Desktop Recorder is part of Kaltura, the video platform in FLO. The Desktop Recorder allows you to create simple videos using your webcam/audio and/or screen capture. You can also record drawings and annotations, and it has a whiteboard. 

          View these videos on using Kaltura Desktop Recorder:

          Written instructions on using the Kaltura Desktop Recorder are also available.


          Snagit

          Snagit is screen capture and basic image editing software that you can use to capture on-screen images and record short videos. It has tools you can use to easily enhance your screen-captured images with visual effects or highlight important information with Snagit’s mark-up tools. You can also use Snagit to resize and annotate images from other sources. Download on University computers via the IDS Support Portal. Home-use licences are available (request via Service One). Snagit is available for both Mac and Windows.

          For more information on using Snagit, check out these helpful tips and tutorials.


          Recording Studios and pods

          Recording Studios are located in Sturt South and Social Science South and the Recording Pods are located in the Central Library. These rooms have sophisticated video and audio recording capabilities. See what the Rooms offer and to find how to book them. After recording at the rooms, it's recommended that you use video editing software like Camtasia to edit your footage.

          View these videos on using the Recording Studio:


          Camtasia

          Camtasia is a video recording and editing software that features a simple drag and drop editing and libraries of effects and interactions. With Camtasia, you can record, then edit your computer screen activity, audio and webcam input. If you capture video footage on mobile devices, digital recorders or a recording studio you can import into Camtasia and edit. Download on University computers via the IDS Support Portal. Home-use licences are available (request via Service One). Camtasia is available for both Mac and Windows.

          To learn more about recording and editing video using Camtasia, check out these helpful tips and tutorials on the TechSmith website.


          Lecture theatre recording

          Teaching spaces equipped with recording facilities can be used to record lectures and other presentations.


          Recording options for guest lecturers and students



          3. Test

          Once you've created your video, it's recommended that you test the final product by previewing with it with sound on before you upload.

          1. If you're using the Kaltura Desktop Recorder, use the preview window.
          2. For Camtasia, Snagit and other software, play the video in full within the program before exporting a published file on your computer.



          4. Administer

          No matter which tool you use to create your video, you're encouraged to host the video in FLO's online video platform Kaltura (rather than a third-party tool like YouTube or Vimeo) for easy upload, management and sharing of your content. To make a video available in your topic, you'll need to first upload it to your personal repository in FLO, called My Media, and publish it to the topic Media Vault in which you want to use it. You (and other members of your teaching team) can then embed these videos within your topic teaching activities and resources. 



          5. Review

          Occasionally, you'll need to review and update the video content and you may be interested in finding out how students are engaging with your videos. FLO has tools to help you do all of this. 

          • If you need to make significant updates to the video content, you'll usually need to do this in the original video project file (e.g. in Camtasia or whichever software you used to produce the video). You can then use the Replace tool to swap out the video for an updated version, if appropriate.
          • For minor changes to the video (like cutting a section out), you can use the editing tools in FLO at any point.
          • For insights into how students are engaging with your video content, some great data is available via the analytics in the topic Media Vault.




           Training and support

           Troubleshooting

          Training

          Support

          • Support on installation: please contact the IDS Service Desk on 12345
          • Support on using Camtasia, Desktop Recorder and SnagIt: please contact your eLearning support team

          No known issues with these tools

          Video - upload a video to Kaltura (My Media) in FLO

          1. Plan  |   2. Build  |  3. Test   | 4. Administer   |  5. Review  ||   Support 

          MyMedia iconYou've created a video. Now you can upload the video to Kaltura (My Media) in FLO and embed it in topic activities for students to view. All common audio and video formats are accepted (eg mp4, mp3, avi, wmv, mov and flv), and can be streamed on all devices, including mobile devices.

          Before you continue reading

          The instructions below are for uploading a video file that you have created outside of FLO.

          If you are creating a video using the Kaltura Desktop Recorder, your video is uploaded to your My Media when you save the recording. There are separate instructions on how to use the Desktop Recorder.

          The next steps:

          1. Upload a video to your My Media and publish into topics
          2. Edit a video after uploading (if required)
          3. Embed a video from the topic Media Vault in teaching activities in FLO topics (separate entry)



          Upload a video to your My Media and publish into topics
          Uploading a video saves it in your My Media, a personal media repository within FLO that's only visible to you. Once you've uploaded the video to My Media, you can then publish into your topic's Media Vault for use by the teaching team, and embed it into activities for students to view. 

          1. Log in to FLO, open the drop-down menu next to your profile picture and select My Media My Media icon

          2. In the top right corner, click Add New > Media Upload.
            Add new menu with Media upload selected

          3. Select and upload the media from your computer (you can drag and drop from a folder or your desktop, or use the Choose a file to upload button to browse your computer). The typical upload time for a fast home network is 10MB per minute. The recommended maximum file size is 150MB.
            Upload by drag and drop

          4. While the upload processes, enter a name and a detailed description. These fields are mandatory for publishing the video for use in topics.
            If you're going to reuse the video in multiple topics, or for a number of years, keep the name and description free of anything too time-specific or too topic-specific. e.g. in the example below, the original video file was saved on the computer as "Week 2 - Literature Review". Removing the "Week 2" from the title when uploaded means that if next year the activity changes to Week 4, there's no need to also update the video name and description. The description field also allows some basic text formatting and adding web links (useful if you want to link to related online resources). 
            Optional: You can also tag the video with relevant keywords so it's more 'searchable' within FLO. 
            Enter video details

          5. Scroll down and click Save Changes. (You can't publish the video into topics until you've saved.)
            Save changes

          6. You'll see confirmation banners that your video is saved in My Media, and that it's set to 'Private'. 
            Confirmation banners saved and set to private

          7. To make the video available for use in your topics (and so that everyone in the teaching team can use it in activities), you should now publish it into the Media Vault for your topic/s. Click Published, then wait for your list of topics to appear underneath. Tick the topics into which you want to publish the video (you can select one or multiple), then click Save Changes
            Publish to topics

          8. Your changes will be saved and the system will confirm the video has been published to the selected topic's Media Vault. 
            Publish to vault confirmed

          9. Next, it's a good idea to Preview the upload. 
            click Preview Media

          10. If the video is ready to use in topic/s, skip to the instructions on embedding a video from the topic Media Vault. If you want to edit the video (ie do things like trim or cut out sections of the video, add captions, add chapter markers, etc) then see the section below on Editing video after uploading.
           

          Edit a video after uploading
          If you need to edit a video after it's been uploaded, you have access to a range of basic editing tools in My Media to trim, cut out sections and replace video. You can also add captions, chapter markers and more. You can edit your video immediately after uploading, or at any time. For detailed information and instructions for using the editing tools, see the entry: Video - Edit in FLO.


          Next step:

          Now you've added the video to your FLO site, you'll need to embed the video where students can see it.


            Training and support

            Troubleshooting

          Training

          Kaltura in FLO (self-paced workshop)

          Support 

          eLearning support team

          For uploading from iOS Apple devices, use Safari rather than Okta.


          Tariq Mohammad Abdul

          Blocks - main entry

          Blocks are a navigational tool in your topic and can provide quick links/access points for students.

          1. Plan  |  2. Build  ||  Support 

          Blocks appear in the Topic Blocks menu in the top right corner of each FLO site. 'Topic Links' is a standard block, with links to topic information, grades, SETs etc. Different kinds of blocks can be added (eg Activities, Teaching team, Upcoming events), or you can add an HTML block and use it to feature the textbook/s or for some other topic-related purpose.  


          Good practice guides and tip sheets

          Good practice guides and tip sheets have been developed to support quality in both curriculum design and teaching practice. Good practice guides provide a pedagogical overview and tip sheets provide you with practical strategies and ideas for implementation. Links to teaching-related resources are provided below. 

          Facilitating Student-Teacher interaction in FLO


          1. Plan

          Some blocks are standard in topics, as part of the college template or starter site. Others you will need to add yourself. You can also move blocks up/down to emphasise important ones.

          The Activities block is particularly useful if you have lots of activities and resources in your topic, as it is a navigational tool for students.

          Types of blocks
          Block name Description
          Activities Lists all activities used in the topic, with links to show all activities of each type
          Attendance Provides a link to the attendance register. Requires the Attendance activity
          Comments Allows students to post comments on the page. Comments will be visible to all users in the topic
          Completion progress The Completion Progress is a time-management tool for students. It visually shows what activities/resources a student is supposed to interact within a course. It is colour-coded so students can quickly see what they have and have not completed/viewed.
          Engagement analytics Moodle Engagement Analytics allows you to easily track student engagement on Moodle against three different indicators of progress. The analytics examines how much students are engaging in: Forum activity. Login frequency.
          Feedback Provides a link to provide feedback. Requires the Feedback activity
          HTML Allows you to enter custom text, links and images
          Inactive user alert
          The Inactive users alert block allows instructors to create alerts per course to determine if students have not accessed the course or important activities by specific dates
          Lecture recordings Provides a link to the lecture management interface (QStream)
          Logged in user Shows the current logged in user (you)
          Messages Links to the Messages tool
          Module links Provides a table of contents of modules in the topic
          People Links to the Participants tool
          Quiz results Shows results from quizzes in the topic
          Random glossary entry Shows a random glossary entry. Requires the Glossary tool
          Recent activity Shows the most recent activity in the topic
          Remote RSS feed Allows you to import RSS feeds from external websites
          Search forums Provides a tool to search all forums in the topic
          Self completion Displays progress on self completion in the topic
          Timeline  Shows students upcoming due dates
          Upcoming events Shows calendar events for the next 7 days


          2. Build

          Add blocks to your topic
          1. In your topic, click Turn editing on
            turn editing on button
          2. Locate the Add a block menu (usually on the right-hand side)
            add a block menu
          3. Select the type of block you wish to add


          Add a teaching team block

          The teaching team block lists the names, photos and optionally contact details of the teaching team. Your block is included in the FLO sites so you will not have to create it yourself unless it has been deleted. 

          Note: To add/alter your profile picture displayed in the Welcome block, see how do I upload a profile photo.

          1. In your topic, click the Turn editing on button

          2. Open the Topic blocks menu

          3. Locate the Add a block dropdown menu (usually on the right-hand side) and select Topic welcome
            select topic welcome from the add a block menu
          4. When the new block appears, click the cog icon to configure the block (see more information below)


          5. In block title, add the text 'Teaching team'

          6. In Roles to display, tick 'topic coordinator', 'teacher' and 'tutor'.

          7. To show more contact methods change the Contact methods to display options.

          8. In Course welcome text

            If your topic uses the starter site, enter a space into the text box. If you want to introduce yourself to students, use a welcome video instead

            If your topic is not yet using the starter site, you can add some introductory text for students here. Try to keep the text short – if you have a lot of content, consider using a welcome video or page resource instead.

          9. When you have finished configuring the block, click Save changes

          Change your user image (via the Topic welcome block)
          1. If you have previously uploaded a profile image, it will automatically display in the welcome block. To add or change your user image, click the edit your profile here link in the block
            follow the 'edit your profile here' link 
          2. Upload your user image clicking the Add button or by dragging and dropping the file into the area indicated
            upload your image
            display of a newly added image

          3. Click Update profile

          4. Your chosen image will now appear in the Welcome block, in addition to many other locations in FLO (eg forum posts)
            a welcome block complete with user image

            Training and support

            Troubleshooting

          Training/Support

          Contact your local eLearning support teams

          No known issues with this tool

          Calendar - main entry

          The Calendar is a centralised place where all dates and events are recorded and collected. You can add events to the Calendar as part of an active teaching approach. Students can also add events (eg group meetings) in the Calendar and personalise their student view.

          1. Plan  |  2. Build ||  Support 

          The Calendar helps students keep track of events within the topic (including assignment due dates) and take responsibility for their learning. They can also export the Calendar into their personal calendar (eg Microsoft Outlook, Google Calendar) for better access.

          The calendar is enabled in all topics by default, but you are encouraged to add the upcoming events block, which shows students a streamlined view of upcoming dates.


          1. Plan

          Think about how your students might use the calendar tool to help them successfully engage with your topic, and promote it to them in your introduction/orientation to the FLO site.


          2. Build

          Add key dates to the calendar (new event)

          Most assessment dates will automatically go in the Calendar (cut off dates being the exception) but you can also manually add key dates (students can also add dates.)

          1. Open the Calendar from the navigation menu (within a topic, the calendar link is below the topic’s links so you will need to scroll down the list).

            The calendar as it appears in the navigation menu. In this picture, it is marked with a red border.

          2. Click on either the date of the booking or the New event button.

          3. Specify the Event title

          4. Choose the Date and time of the event

          5. Specify the type of event.
            1. If Topic, the entry will be shown to the entire class.
            2. If User, it will be private to you only
            3. If Group, it will be visible to only the group you choose

          6. To add an end date, description or set it as a repeating event, click on the Show more link

          7. Click the Save button
          Export the calendar to Outlook (or another calendar)

          You can import events in your FLO site into your Outlook calendar (or another calendar). This may help you manage the topic/events. There are two steps in this process: in FLO and in your calendar in Outlook.

          Note: External calendar programs such as Outlook may only sync to calendars periodically, so the calendar may not update instantly. Outlook will sync every three hours.

          In FLO

          1. Open the calendar from the Navigation menu.

            The calendar in the navigation menu. In this image it is marked with a red border

          2. Click on the Export calendar button underneath the calendar.

          3. Choose which events and the time frame you wish to export. For the most information, select ‘all events’ and ‘custom range’.

            The export calendar screen. The options suggested above are marked with red borders

          4. Click on the Get calendar URL button. Copy the Calendar URL that will appear underneath the button.

          5. You can now import the calendar. The steps from this point vary depending on what website/app you use.

          In Microsoft Outlook

          1. Open Outlook on your computer and select Add Calendar > From Internet from the Calendar tab


          2. Paste the Calendar URL you copied in the indicated space and click on the OK button

          3. Click Yes when asked to receive updates from the Calendar

            A picture of the box that appears asking you to receive updates from the calendar

          Other Calendars

          View the help pages for the website or app you are using to find out how to add the calendar URL.


            Training and support

            Troubleshooting

          Support

          Contact you local eLearning support team

          No known issues with this tool


          Download and install Kaltura Desktop Recorder (video)

          Kaltura - How people are using it (video)