Collaborate - main entry

Collaborate is a live, collaborative space that provides the ability to chat, screen-share, share audio and video, poll students, collaborate using a virtual whiteboard or group participants into small 'break-out' spaces. Using the Collaborate activity in a topic ideally consists of the following 5 stages.

1. Plan  |  2. Build  |  3. Test  |  4. Administer  |  5. Review  ||  Support 
Collaborate icon

Collaborate is a new tool for the University in 2017 and was chosen due to its modern and intuitive interface, the ability to be used by anyone within the University (with up to 250 participants per session) and Collaborate's focus on accessibility and technologies to optimise the session to the participants available bandwidth. The 15 minute video below provides an overview of Collaborate, how this tool differs to FLO Live (used before 2018): Login or click here to view the video if it doesn't appear below : Transitioning to Collaborate 

 

If you wish to collaborate as a teaching team (ie with other staff) you could use Webex – an online video and audio-enabled meeting place that allows you to meet with anyone, anywhere, in real time using a web browser on your computer or mobile device, including iPad, iPhone or Andriod.


1. Plan

The following information will provide information on best practice and use cases for Collaborate as well as guide you to adding and creating Collaborate sessions within your FLO topic.

Collaborate may be used in a range of purposes: 1. One-to-one  2. One-to-many and 3. Many-to-many


1. One to one

Discussion/consultation between one academic and one student
This format usually replaces a face-to-face consultation/meeting due to distance as a barrier for staff or student. May be useful for discussing topics virtually face-to-face for remote students, including supervised research students, where a document needs to be shared on the screen (in comparison to a phone only discussion which does not require a visual sharing). Not traditionally recorded, but individual video camera advisable.

Presentation by an individual student for assessment purpose to one other (teacher)
This format will replace the face-to-face aural/visual presentation due to distance as a barrier. Individual student presents to an assessor (teacher). Not traditionally recorded, but individual video camera advisable.

 

2. One to many

Group discussion between students and teacher
This format is useful for discussing assessment requirements prior to submission, where distance or time is a barrier. Students are provided the opportunity to ask questions of their teacher and/or peers to help clarify any confusing information associated with the assessment task. Aural discussions are more useful at clarifying points than written email or forum posts, as ideas can be expressed differently. The session can be recorded to provide the information for non-attendees. Individual (presenter) video camera advisable.

Tutorials and lecture-style sessions
This format sees one presenter/teacher presenting to multiple participants, where discussion or quizzing interaction is encouraged. The session can be recorded to provide the information for non-attendees or as revision for attendees. If no interaction is encouraged for this session, then the presentation may be best recorded using video creation tools like Camtasia and Kaltura Desktop Recorder, both freely available at Flinders University. Individual (presenter) video camera advisable.

Presentation by a student for assessment or other task to a group of students
This format will replace the face-to-face aural/visual presentation due to distance as a barrier. Individual student presents to a small group of students and an assessor (teacher). The session can be recorded to provide the information for non-attendees. Individual (presenter) video camera advisable.

 

3. Many to many

Group discussion between students
This format opens communication equally between all participants in a session. Common uses for this approach is for student peer discussion over a shared task or assessment where location is a barrier. Other uses for this approach is to discuss topics from tutorial tasks. Breaking up large group of students into small groups for facilitating discussion is appropriate in this format. Individual video camera and recording of session not advisable.

Presentation by a group of students for assessment or other task to another group of students
This format will replace the face-to-face aural/visual presentation due to distance as a barrier. Students present to a small group of students and an assessor (teacher). The session can be recorded to provide the information for non-attendees. Individual video camera not advisable (especially as break-out rooms are not recorded).

Collaborative task between students
This format includes students sharing documents and screens to support their collaboration, such as preparing for a presentation or other activity. Individual video camera and recording of session not advisable.


In the Collaborate planning guide, explore the key topics associated with planning to use Collaborate, such as: 


2. Build

You have planned your use of the Collaborate virtual classroom. Now add the Collaborate shortcut to FLO (if its not already there) and create your sessions.

  1. How to add Collaborate to your FLO topic
  2. How to create sessions

3. Test

When using a tool like Collaborate for the first time, it is a good idea to give yourself and your students the opportunity to test they can enter the room. This will help reduce unnecessary technical issues before scheduling important sessions.

Create a session and informally invite your students to visit during a scheduled time. Alternatively, encourage students to use the 'Course room' to visit you. The Course room is open at all times, and will provide students the opportunity to meet with you or with each other at anytime without the need to schedule sessions. It also enables users (you and your students) to check that they can enter the room and use some features, like video, audio and chat.


4. Administer

Two key aspects associated with management, is to manage access to session recordings and share access links to users (including those outside of the FLO topic).


5. Review

It is important that you evaluate your use of Collaborate at the conclusion of each session. This will help you to improve your use of the tool and tehrefore enhance learning and teaching.


  Training and support

  Troubleshooting

Training

Flinders offers both Face-to-Face training, online training and has a recording of our training for Collaborate:

Support

You may have one of the following issues:

  • unable to use a breakout room more than once in a session - no fix available at this stage
  • unable to use microphone when using Firefox 61 or above - see known issues page
  • repeat sessions appearing 1 day in the future - see known issues page

» How-to glossary