Create videos for teaching

Creating videos for teaching purposes in the comfort of your office, home or while 'on location', can be a useful technique to share information or thoughts, visually and orally. One of the most common educational reasons to create video content is to share something with students which cannot be captured or communicated in any other way. This is especially true for fully online courses. The following notes are to support staff in creating quality teaching videos (Do-It-Yourself or DIY), which are not captured as part of the University lecture recording system. 

The recommend tool for this task is Camtasia, with the support of Snagit, an image capturing and editing tool. As of December 2015, Flinders University offers Camtasia for video and audio production, and SnagIt for creating and editing images. This software, created by TechSmith, will be made available to all staff at no cost. 


When planning to create your own educational videos, consider:

  • why are you making a video?
  • what are you displaying visually and aurally?
  • how long is the video going to be?
  • how and where are you going to record the video?
  • how are you going to share the video?
  • what equipment do you need to use to make your video good quality?

There are a number of ways to create videos yourself for teaching purposes using a range of resources from the freely available tools with a DIY approach to the low-cost software. Examples include: 

  • capturing a lecture in a face-to-face environment with an accompanying presentation for review by students online 
  • creating content for a flipped classroom approach, where the content is delivered via a video medium and face-to-face class time is spent in an interactive or practical activity 
  • using video in peer assessment and feedback practices 
  • producing mini-lectures which target important or commonly misunderstood concepts 
  • producing content for revision or assessment preparation 
  • encouraging students to present knowledge and understanding through a visual media tool 
  • capturing unique experiences or perspectives through interviews with industry experts

These examples can be broken down into three common approaches to videos:
video styles
Capturing your computer or mobile screen (with or without you)       Capturing you or others (such as an interview)     Capture your screen as a digital whiteboard
When planning to use purposely built videos in your teaching, you have the option to record more than just your face. Some tools will give you the opportunity to record the computer or tablet screen either independently or together with your face. By recording your screen, you can show your students, for example, how to use a component of a piece of software, where to find something online, or to share a document (Word, PDF etc.) and talk through the document highlight or drawing over the key components of what you are explaining. This is known as screen capturing or screen casting. Examples of educational videos are available in the Getting started with creating educational videos tab below. 

To get started, it is worth reviewing an examples of educational videos. What features of these videos do you like and would consider using? What ideas have you drawn from reviewing another others videos? How can you use this knowledge to plan your own videos?

Source: FlindersMPAonline (Jan 7, 2015). POAD8077 Agency and public policy. Retrieved from http://youtu.be/4XFWQ2BBUc8?list=PLHdzC6Pe16JpOlb_dXIr45HJU9vdut9uy

Thanks to Gerry Redmond for sharing this video

Talking points for good practice:

  • Technology: Personal video camera/tripod and Movie Maker
  • Concept: Created for students to grasp specific content using a personal approach to delivering short content
  • Key features: Video of event and person in outdoor setting

Located in BIOL2702, S2 2014 'Prelab 2'

Thanks to Masha Smallhorn for sharing this video

Talking point for good practice:

  • Technology: Camtasia Studio
  • Concept: Created for students to prepare for biology practical labs
  • Key features: Screen capture of visual presentation (PowerPoint slides) and small video of speaker at all times

Source: VincentPost. (Mar 22, 2014). w04_I01. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BatUx1KzDTs&feature=youtu.be

Thanks to Vincent Post for sharing this video

Talking points for good practice:

  • Technology: Adobe Presenter and Livescribe pen in PowerPoint 
  • Concept: Created for students to learn targeted concepts 
  • Key features: Screen capture of visual presentations, small video of speaker intermittently and drawing on screen for key visual components

Located in BIOL2702, S2 2014 'Reptile data'

Thanks to Mike Gardner for sharing the video

Talking point for good practice:

  • Technology: Camtasia Studio
  • Concept: Created for students to demonstrate a specific software program
  • Key features: Screen capture of visual presentation (specialised software program) and small video of speaker at all times

 Outside of Flinders University, these examples will help inspire you to think beyond the basics.

First person POV video to enhance mobile learning: Expert in My Pocket

Source: Expert in my Pocket. (June 3, 2014). Bag mask ventilation. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/Wv78jVhSFTI

Talking points for good practice:

  • Technology: Captured on GoPro
  • Concept: Created for students to view the content from a first person point of view 
  • Key features: Video of event and person in an indoor, authentic setting

Storytelling approach: English for Uni (University of Adelaide) 

Source: University of Adelaide. (June 15, 2014). Stolen on the Outback Express. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/PYNFhaeFPfk 

Talking point for good practice:

  • Technology: Professional equipment
  • Concept: Created for students to support learning academic English skills
  • Key features: Movie style, with a story and concept being told on camera

Changing the lecture: An introduction to Globalisation by James Arvanitakis (University of Western Sydney)

Source: James Arvanitakis. (July 8, 2012). Introduction to globalisation by James Arvanitakis. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/24_7Ki87-c0

Talking points for good practice:

  • Technology: Mobile camera (potentially phone)
  • Concept: Created to introduce students to the key topic
  • Key features: Capture of person 'on location' and use of interview-style with others

The presenter style - TED Talks: Salman Kahn: Let’s use video to reinvent education

Source: TED. (Mar 9, 2011). Salman Kahn: Let’s use video to reinvent education. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nTFEUsudhfs

Talking point for good practice:

  • Technology: Professional equipment
  • Concept: Created for educators
  • Key features: Capture of visual presenter and screen captures for examples


Whether you are starting from scratch or editing an existing video you made, these tips may help

Planning your video with a storyboard  

storyboard exampleWhen making a video, one the most important elements is to plan your video using a storyboard technique. A 'storyboard' is a "graphic representation of how your video will unfold, shot by shot" (Video Maker Tips, 2014). The traditional structure of a storyboard is made up of squares with hand drawn illustrations depicting each shot with notes about what is going to happen in the scene, including any narrations. Each square is a shot or scene. Storyboards do not have to be detailed, but are designed to help you think through the process of creating a video.

By using a storyboard as the first step in your video production process, you are able to: share your vision visually; prepare for elements of your production phase (identifying scene, props etc); save you time during the post-production phase by ordering your collection of shots.

Open a simple storyboard template at https://flo.flinders.edu.au/mod/resource/view.php?id=852117

Open a Script/Narration template at https://flo.flinders.edu.au/mod/resource/view.php?id=852113 

Setting up your computer

Setting up your computer is an important first step to ensure you are technically able to create videos. A detailed list of planning steps is available in the 'Creating educational videos with Camtasia' FLO site, which is equally relevant in preparing to make videos in any video software or application. This includes exploring what equipment to borrow/buy, how to film outdoor and how to film indoors.

Recording and editing your video can be achieved simply and easily with a range of online tools and software, both on a computer and on a phone/tablet. However, some software programs allow you to capture (record) some types of video and edit, all in one. Camtasia Studio and iMovie (iOS) are just a few examples. Other programs allow you only to record or only to edit, so you must use a second program/tool to create a video. You are advised to keep this in mind when selecting a tool for recording your video content. 

Recording your content can be achieved in many ways: 

  • Your computer to capture the screen 
  • Your computer to capture you 
  • Your mobile device to capture you and others
  • A digital camera to you and others
Once you have recorded your video content, you can assemble and edit it into a video. At Flinders University, we recommend Camtasia for recording videos at your computer desk, which may or may not include recording your screen, or outdoors using a mobile application Fuse.
To learn more about recording video using Camtasia, view https://www.techsmith.com/tutorial-camtasia.html

As mentioned in the previous section, recording and editing your video can be achieved simply and easily with a range of online tools and software, both on a computer and on a phone/tablet. However, some software programs allow you to capture (record) some types of video and edit, all in one.

Editing your content can be achieved in many ways: 

  • On your computer 
  • On your mobile device
  • On your digital camera's integrated software
Once you have selected an editing tool,  you can begin the process to remove unwanted content and assembling the content into a smooth flowing video which may include a combination of video footage, images and narrations/music.  At Flinders University, we recommend Camtasia for editing videos at your computer desk, which may or may not include video components taken at your computer screen, or outdoors using a mobile application Fuse, or photographs taken with a digital camera.
To learn more about recording video using Camtasia, view https://www.techsmith.com/tutorial-camtasia.html

An example of an embedded video using Media Vault. Users not logged in can click here to view : Getting started with Diigo

In 2017, a new online video (and audio) platform was integrated with FLO to provide a repository for media. This system is recommended and is supported by the university's eLearning support teams. 

My Media is your private audio and video repository in FLO where you (staff and students) can upload, store and view your media. Your media can only be viewed by you until you publish or embed it in a FLO topic site (staff) or in an assignment submission (students).

For staff: Each FLO topic site has is own Media Vault, this is only visible to the teaching team. Once you have uploaded your media to My Media you can add it to a topic Media Vault, then anyone who can edit the FLO site can embed it on a page.

For the help guide for using the online video platform, visit https://flextra.flinders.edu.au/flex/public/ovp/help


Once you have created a video (and saved it as a mp4, mp3, wav, avi, mpeg, mov, flv. format), upload it to your My Media and publish it to Media Vault. Use the steps in the Teacher: Getting started section to embed the video in FLO wherever you see an HTML editor (displayed below).

Embed (Publish) 





  Training and support

  Troubleshooting

Training
  • Training is available for making educational videos in Camtasia Studio. Refer to the Flinders University Staff Dev page for scheduled and up-coming sessions.  
  • Online tutorial materials for Camtasia and Snagit have been assembled
  • Install the software for free on your work and home computers: Camtasia and Snagit 
  • The first time you start Camtasia, the program will open a tutorial video. You can find this video again later under Help> Open Getting Started Project within Camtasia. This built-in video will give basic instructions on how to use Camtasia

Technical support 

Support on installation: please contact the ITS Service Desk on 12345.

Support on using Camtasia and/or SnagIt: please contact your eLearning team

No problems reported

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